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500 CPS Synchronous Rotary Gap transmitter at Brant Rock, Ma. Ca: 1906.
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1906Blackman's PointBrant RockState: MAZip: 02050Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Wireless_Radio_Broadcast_by_Reginald_A._Fessenden,_1906Creator: Reginald A. Fessenden

On 24 December 1906, the first radio broadcast for entertainment and music was transmitted from Brant Rock, Massachusetts to the general public. This pioneering broadcast was achieved after years of development work by Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1866-1932) who built a complete system of wireless transmission and reception using amplitude modulation (AM) of continuous electromagnetic waves. This technology was a revolutionary departure from transmission of dots and dashes widespread at the time.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Michael Thompson (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: 500 CPS Synchronous Rotary Gap transmitter at Brant Rock, Ma. Ca: 1906.Era_date_from: 1906
Arne Larsson
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1957-1958C. H. Best InstituteTorontoState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Wearable_Cardiac_Pacemaker,_1957-1958Creator: Bakken, Earl E.

During the winter of 1957-58, Earl E. Bakken developed the first wearable transistorized pacemaker, the request of heart surgeon, Dr. C. Walton Lillehei. As earlier pacemakers were AC-powered, this battery-powered device liberated patients from their power-cord tethers. The wearable pacemaker was a significant step in the evolution to fully-implantable units.

YearAdded:
1999
Image Credit: Courtesy Professor Marko Turina, University Hospital, Zurich (CC BY 3.0)Image Caption: Arne H. W. Larsson (26th May 1915 to 28th December 2001) was the first recipient of an implantable pacemaker. He received the first device in 1958 and had a total of 26 devices during his life. He became an advocate for patients needing pacemakers, campaigning for greater funding and research in this area.Era_date_from: 1957
First Transpacific Reception of a Television (TV) Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1963Ibaraki Satellite Communication CenterTakahagiZip: 318-0022Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transpacific_Reception_of_a_Television_%28TV%29_Signal_via_Satellite,_1963

On 23 November 1963, this site received the first transpacific transmission of a TV signal from Mojave earth station in California, U.S.A., via the Relay 1 communications satellite. The Ibaraki earth station used a 20m Cassegrain antenna, the first use of this type of antenna for commercial telecommunications. This event demonstrated the capability and impact of satellite communications and helped open a new era of intercontinental live TV programming relayed via satellite.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Caption: Artist's vision of NASA Relay 1 satelliteEra_date_from: 1963
First Transatlantic Reception of a Television Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Parc du Radôme
Pleumeur-BodouCountry: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transatlantic_Reception_of_a_Television_Signal_via_Satellite,_1962

On 11 July 1962 a station in Pimsleur-Bodou received the first transatlantic transmission of a TV signal from a twin station in Andover, Maine, USA via the TELSTAR satellite. The success of TELSTAR and the earth stations, the first built for active satellite communications, illustrated the potential of a future world-wide satellite system to provide communications between continents.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Nicholas Lannuzel (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radome in Pimsleur-Bodou.Era_date_from: 1962
First Television Broadcast in Western Canada
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1953CBC Broadcasting Site, Mount SeymourNorth VancouverState: BCZip: V7G 1L3Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Television_Broadcast_in_Western_CanadaCreator: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

On 16 December 1953, the first television broadcast in Western Canada was transmitted from this site by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's CBUT Channel 2. The engineering experience gained here was instrumental in the subsequent establishment of the more than one thousand public and private television broadcasting sites that serve Western Canada today.

YearAdded:
2010
Era_date_from: 1953
First Semiconductor Integrated Circuit (IC)
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Texas Instruments, North CampusDallasState: TXZip: 75243Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Semiconductor_Integrated_Circuit_%28IC%29,_1958Creator: Kilby, Jack S.

On 12 September 1958, Jack S. Kilby demonstrated the first working integrated circuit to managers at Texas Instruments. This was the first time electronic components were integrated onto a single substrate. This seminal device consisted of a phase shift oscillator circuit on a tiny bar of germanium measuring 7/16” by 1/16” (11.1 mm by 1.6 mm). Today, integrated circuits are the fundamental building blocks of virtually all electronic equipment.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Texas InstrumentsImage Caption: Jack Kilby's original integrated circuit.Era_date_from: 1958
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1974-1982Lincoln LaboratoryLexingtonState: MAZip: 02493Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Real-Time_Speech_Communication_on_Packet_Networks,_1974_-_1982
In August 1974, the first real-time speech communication over a packet-switched network was demonstrated via ARPANET between MIT Lincoln Laboratory and USC Information Sciences Institute. By 1982, these technologies enabled Internet packet speech and conferencing linking terrestrial, packet radio, and satellite networks.
YearAdded:
2011
Era_date_from: 1974
First Radio Astronomical Observations Using Very Long Baseline Interferometry
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1967Dominion Radio Astrophysical ObservatoryCaledenState: BCZip: V0H 1K0Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Radio_Astronomical_Observations_Using_Very_Long_Baseline_Interferometry

On the morning of 17 April 1967, radio astronomers used this radiotelescope at DRAO and a second one at the Algonquin Radio Observatory located 3074 km away to make the first successful radio astronomical observations using Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Today, VLBI networks span the globe, extend into space and continue to make significant contributions to both radio astronomy and geodesy.

YearAdded:
2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bulliver (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radiotelescope at DRAOEra_date_from: 1967
First Operational Use Of Wireless Telegraphy
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1899-1902Telkom MuseumCapetownCountry: South AfricaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Operational_Use_Of_Wireless_Telegraphy,_1899-1902

The first use of wireless telegraphy in the field occurred during the Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902). The British Army experimented with Marconi's system and the British Navy successfully used it for communication among naval vessels in Delagoa Bay, prompting further development of Marconi's wireless telegraph system for practical uses. The Anglo-Boer War of 1899-1902 will be remembered as the last of the gentleman's wars, the war that marked the end of the Victorian era.

YearAdded:
1999
Image Credit: Courtesy Cardiff Council Flat Holm Project (CC BY 3.0)Image Caption: Post Office Engineers inspect Marconi's equipment on Flat Holm, May 1897Era_date_from: 1899
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1876BostonState: MAZip: 02203Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Intelligible_Voice_Transmission_over_Electric_Wire,_1876Creator: Bell, Alexander Graham

The first transmission of intelligible speech over electrical wires took place on 10 March 1876. Inventor Alexander Graham Bell called out to his assistant Thomas Watson, “Mr. Watson, come here! I want to see you.” This transmission took place in their attic laboratory located in a near here at 5 Exeter Place. A pioneer in the field of telecommunications, Alexander Graham Bell was born in 1847 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He moved to Ontario, and then to the United States, settling in Boston, before beginning his career as an inventor.

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: The telephone used in the first intelligible transmission over electrical wires.Era_date_from: 1876
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