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Television

First Transpacific Reception of a Television (TV) Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1963Ibaraki Satellite Communication CenterTakahagiZip: 318-0022Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transpacific_Reception_of_a_Television_%28TV%29_Signal_via_Satellite,_1963

On 23 November 1963, this site received the first transpacific transmission of a TV signal from Mojave earth station in California, U.S.A., via the Relay 1 communications satellite. The Ibaraki earth station used a 20m Cassegrain antenna, the first use of this type of antenna for commercial telecommunications. This event demonstrated the capability and impact of satellite communications and helped open a new era of intercontinental live TV programming relayed via satellite.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Caption: Artist's vision of NASA Relay 1 satelliteEra_date_from: 1963
First Transatlantic Reception of a Television Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Parc du Radôme
Pleumeur-BodouCountry: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transatlantic_Reception_of_a_Television_Signal_via_Satellite,_1962

On 11 July 1962 a station in Pimsleur-Bodou received the first transatlantic transmission of a TV signal from a twin station in Andover, Maine, USA via the TELSTAR satellite. The success of TELSTAR and the earth stations, the first built for active satellite communications, illustrated the potential of a future world-wide satellite system to provide communications between continents.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Nicholas Lannuzel (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radome in Pimsleur-Bodou.Era_date_from: 1962
First Television Broadcast in Western Canada
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1953CBC Broadcasting Site, Mount SeymourNorth VancouverState: BCZip: V7G 1L3Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Television_Broadcast_in_Western_CanadaCreator: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

On 16 December 1953, the first television broadcast in Western Canada was transmitted from this site by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's CBUT Channel 2. The engineering experience gained here was instrumental in the subsequent establishment of the more than one thousand public and private television broadcasting sites that serve Western Canada today.

YearAdded:
2010
Era_date_from: 1953
Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1980-1989DateCreated: 1984NHK Science and Technology Research LaboratoriesTokyoCountry: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Direct_Broadcast_Satellite_Service,_1984Creator: NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation)

NHK began the world's first direct broadcast satellite service in May, 1984. This was the culmination of eighteen years of research that included the development of an inexpensive low-noise receiver and investigations of rain attenuation in the 12 GHz band. RRL, NASDA, TSCJ, Toshiba Corporation, General Electric Company, and NASA participated with NHK to make satellite broadcasting to the home a practical reality.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Makro Freak (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: A modern parabolic satellite communications antenna at Erdfunkstelle RaistingEra_date_from: 1984
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1924-1941Shizuoka UniversityHamamatsu Zip: 432-8011Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Development_of_Electronic_Television,_1924-1941Creator: Kenjiro Takayanagi
Professor Kenjiro Takayanagi started his research program in television at Hamamatsu Technical College (now Shizuoka University) in 1924. He transmitted an image of the Japanese character イ(i) on a cathode-ray tube on 25 December 1926 and broadcast video over an electronic television system in 1935. His work, patents, articles, and teaching helped lay the foundation for the rise of Japanese television and related industries to global leadership. The milestone plaque may be viewed at the site of the research at Hamamatsu Technical College (now Shizuoka University).
YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/sphlImage Caption: A recreation of Professor Takayanagi's first demonstration of television on display at Shizuoka University.Era_date_from: 1924
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