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2010

T.S. Lowe Ascent
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeDateCreated: 1861National Mall at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space MuseumWashington, D.C.Country: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About_AIAA/News_Room/BalloonHistoricSite.pdfCreator: Lowe, T.S.

T.S.C. Lowe’s Observation Flight

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2010
Image Caption: View of balloon ascension. Prof. Thaddeus Lowe observing the Battle of Seven Pines or Fair Oaks from his balloon "Intrepid" on the north side of the Chicahominy.
First Television Broadcast in Western Canada
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1953CBC Broadcasting Site, Mount SeymourNorth VancouverState: BCZip: V7G 1L3Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Television_Broadcast_in_Western_CanadaCreator: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

On 16 December 1953, the first television broadcast in Western Canada was transmitted from this site by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's CBUT Channel 2. The engineering experience gained here was instrumental in the subsequent establishment of the more than one thousand public and private television broadcasting sites that serve Western Canada today.

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2010
Era_date_from: 1953
First Radio Astronomical Observations Using Very Long Baseline Interferometry
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1967Dominion Radio Astrophysical ObservatoryCaledenState: BCZip: V0H 1K0Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Radio_Astronomical_Observations_Using_Very_Long_Baseline_Interferometry

On the morning of 17 April 1967, radio astronomers used this radiotelescope at DRAO and a second one at the Algonquin Radio Observatory located 3074 km away to make the first successful radio astronomical observations using Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Today, VLBI networks span the globe, extend into space and continue to make significant contributions to both radio astronomy and geodesy.

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2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bulliver (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radiotelescope at DRAOEra_date_from: 1967
First 500 MeV Proton Beam from the TRIUMF Cyclotron
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1974TRIUMF Meson FacilityVancouverState: BCZip: V6T 2A3Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_500_MeV_Proton_Beam_from_the_TRIUMF_Cyclotron,_1974

At 3:30 pm on 15 December 1974, the first 500 MeV proton beam was extracted from the TRIUMF cyclotron. Since then, TRIUMF has used proton beams from its cyclotron (and secondary beams of pions, muons, neutrons and radioactive ions produced in its experimental halls) to conduct pioneering studies that have advanced nuclear physics, particle physics, molecular and materials science, and nuclear medicine.

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2010
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: Staff with the Lower Magnet Assembly of the TRIUMF.Era_date_from: 1974
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1890Institut Catholique de ParisParisZip: 75006Country: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Discovery_of_Radioconduction_by_Edouard_Branly,_1890Creator: Branly, Edouard
The discovery of the radioconduction is a phenomenon which revolutionized the means of communication. It is at the origin of the development of the TSF (Télégraphie Sans Fil, or wireless telegraphy). As a member of the French Academy of Sciences (it gains vis-a-vis Marie Curie), Branly received international recognition. No more than about fifteen years separate the first wireless transmission across a few meters (1890) from the first transatlantic communication (Marconi, December 1901).
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2010
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: Edouard BranlyEra_date_from: 1890
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ResearchEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 19464455 Genesee StreetBuffaloState: NYZip: 14225Country: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About_AIAA/News_Room/Cornell_PR2010.pdfCreator: Wright Brothers, Curtiss, Glenn

Tracing its history to the earliest days of powered flight – to the Wright brothers and Glenn Curtiss – the site began as the research laboratory of the Curtiss-Wright Aircraft Company. After World War II, it was donated to Cornell University, and in January 1946 opened its doors as the Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory. Nearly every military aircraft and space vehicle developed in the United States from the end of World War II until the present day has been tested at the facility, now known as Calspan.

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2010
Image Caption: Ronald Patterson, a Cornell Aeronautical Labs technician, poses with a prototype of the lab's famous "man-amplifier" concept in 1961.Era_date_from: 1946
Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1967Apollo RoadACTState: ACTZip: 2620Country: AustraliaWebsite: http://intranet.aiaa.org/industryresources/PDF/AustraliaHistoricSitesPR.pdf, https://www.honeysucklecreek.net/images/AIAA/AIAA_Booklet_HSK-ORR-TID.pdfCreator: NASA

Established between 1967, the Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station, along with the Tidbinbilla and Orroral Valley sites, supported NASA’s Deep Space Network, Manned Space Flight Network, and Spacecraft Tracking and Data Acquisition Network. The stations played a key role in supporting the Apollo 11 moon landing, with the Honeysuckle Creek facility providing the first historic pictures of man walking on the moon on July 20, 1969 (July 21st in Australia), as well as providing voice and telemetry contact with the lunar module.

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2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/wxwhyz (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Honeysuckle Creek Tracking StationEra_date_from: 1967
Orroral Valley Tracking Station
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1965LOT 8 Orroral RdTennent CreeState: ACTZip: 2620Country: AustraliaWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/, https://www.honeysucklecreek.net/images/AIAA/AIAA_Booklet_HSK-ORR-TID.pdfCreator: NASA

Established 1965 the Orroral Valley Station, as well as the Honeysuckle Creek (1967) and Tidbinbilla (1965) sites supported NASA’s Deep Space Network, Manned Space Flight Network, and Spacecraft Tracking and Data Acquisition Network. The stations played a key role in supporting the Apollo 11 moon landing, with the Honeysuckle Creek facility providing the first historic pictures of man walking on the moon on July 20, 1969 (July 21st in Australia), as well as providing voice and telemetry contact with the lunar module.

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2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Percita (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Orroral Valley Tracking StationEra_date_from: 1965
Tidbinbilla Tracking Station
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1965Tidbinbilla Nature ReservePaddys RiverState: ACTZip: 2620Country: AustraliaWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/Creator: Menzies, Robert, NASA

Established 1965 the Tidbinbilla Tracking Station, as well as the Honeysuckle Creek (1967-1981) and Orroral Valley (1965-1985) sites, supported NASA’s Deep Space Network, Manned Space Flight Network, and Spacecraft Tracking and Data Acquisition Network. The stations played a key role in supporting the Apollo 11 moon landing, with the Honeysuckle Creek facility providing the first historic pictures of man walking on the moon on July 20, 1969 (July 21st in Australia), as well as providing voice and telemetry contact with the lunar module.

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2010
Image Credit: Original Image: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: Tidbinbilla Tracking StationEra_date_from: 1965
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1914LouisvilleState: KYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-247-belle-of-louisville, http://files.asme.org/asmeorg/Communities/History/Landmarks/22719.pdfCreator: James Rees & Sons
The Belle of Louisville, built in 1914, is the oldest operating “western rivers” steamboat. It has the shallow-draft flat-bottom hull braced by hog-chain trusses, multiple fire-tube boilers, paddlewheel propulsion, and superstructure configuration that were characteristic of hundreds of steamboats that plied America’s rivers during the 19th and 20th centuries
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2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bailey Visual Life (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Belle of Louisville, still in operationEra_date_from: 1914
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