Skip to main content

1910-1919

Rumely OilPull Tractor
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1910La Porte HospitalLa PorteState: INZip: 46350Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rumley-oilpull-42.aspx

The Rumely Companies, which operated in La Porte, Indiana, from 1853 to 1931, produced a variety of equipment including threshers and steam engines, which helped to change the nature of American and world agriculture. The revolutionary OilPull Tractor, which was introduced in 1910, used a unique carburetion system developed by John Secor, the Company's Chief Engineer. The OilPull tractor efficiently converted a low cost petroleum product to mechanical power, greatly reducing the need for animal and steam power on American farms. Dr.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/BulldozerD11 (CC BY-SA 3.0)
Naval Air Station North Island
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Naval Air Station North IslandSan DiegoState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/HISTC/Shared%20Documents/Historic%20Aerospace%20Sites%20(HAS)/Procedures%20and%20templates/HAS%20blurb.docCreator: U.S. Navy

Known as the birthplace of Naval Aviation, North Island was the site of the first successful seaplane flight and the first amphibious flight in the U.S., both made by Glenn Curtiss.  The first Naval pilot, Lt. T.G. Ellyson, was trained here at the Curtiss Aviation Camp.  A flight school established here by Ellyson trained the next Naval aviators as well as the Navy’s first aviation maintenance personnel.  North Island was also the site of the first night flight, and the home of the first aircraft carrier, the USS Langley.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Caption: USS George Washington and USS Ronald Reagan pierside at Naval Air Station North Island
Entrance to NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia, United States.
Era: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Langley Research CenterHamptonState: VACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=15032386787Creator: NASA

The Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, now the core of the Langley Research Center, was a unique facility that served as the nexus of aerodynamic research in the U.S. from its beginning in 1917 to its transformation into NASA’s Langley Research Center in 1958. It achieved world renown for its variety of specialized research tools and its staff’s emphasis on practical solutions to the problems of flight.

 

YearAdded:
2001
Image Caption: Entrance to NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia, United States.
The Boeing Red Barn taken in 1937
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1916The Museum of FlightSeattleState: WACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=26571Creator: Boeing, William E.

This former shipyard was the first home of the The Boeing Company, founded in 1916.  Affectionately called the Red Barn, this structure was built in 1909, and became the historic birthplace of Boeing aircraft production. Starting with the Boeing Model C, all early Boeing production took place in this building. Here, the entrepreneurial spirit of William E.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: public domainImage Caption: The Boeing Red Barn taken in 1937.
Sikorsky VS-300
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Sikorsky Memorial AirportStratfordState: CTCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=19687Creator: Sikorsky, Igor I.

Igor I. Sikorsky, engineering manager of the Vought – Sikorsky Division of the former United Aircraft Corporation, used the Stratford, Conn., sites to design, build, and test his innovative helicopter designs. Sikorsky’s VS-300 model helicopter was the world’s first design which used the now industry-standard single main rotor with an auxiliary anti-torque tail rotor.

Image Caption: Sikorsky’s VS-300 model helicopter
airport of Getafe
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Getafe Air BaseGetafeCountry: SpainWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About_AIAA/News_Room/GetafeHistoricSitePR.pdf

Getafe Airfield was the site of the world’s first successful rotorcraft flight, on January 17, 1923. Lieutenant Alejandro Gómez Spencer piloted a C.4 Autogiro designed and built by Juan de la Cierva, who tested a series of autogiros between 1920 and 1924 at the Getafe site. Cierva’s autogiros introduced important technologies and flight techniques that led to the development of helicopters and other rotary wing aircraft.

 

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Miguel303xm (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Airplanes in the airport of Getafe, Getafe, Madrid
Society: ASCESub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 19152 Pine StLockportState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/flight-of-five-locks/

The confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson rivers was the site of distinct advances in transportation of the early 19th Century. The Erie Canal in 1825 and the Mohawk and Hudson Railroad in 1831 were both of national significance.  

Grand Central Terminal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 191389 E 42nd StNew YorkState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/grand-central-terminal/Creator: Wilgus, William J.

Spearheaded by Chief Engineer William J. Wilgus and constructed under challenging conditions with no interruption of existing train service, Grand Central Terminal was a triumph of innovative engineering in the design of urban transportation centers. Its novel, two-level station, made possible by electric traction, streamlined both train and passenger movement by separating long-haul and suburban traffic and employing an extensive system of pedestrian ramps throughout the facility.

Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Sracer357 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Grand Central Terminal Main Lobby

The big Allis-Chalmers triple-expansion engine is dead, but not to Walter Wilson and Daniel Hoffman. These men are, respectively, division foreman and manager of pumping and maintenance for New Jersey’s Hackensack Water Company; but back in the 1940s they were just starting there as two young engineers fresh out of the Navy, and the engine was very much alive. In fact, it seemed like home to them: “When you were up at the top there,” Hoffman says, gesturing to a lofty catwalk close under the high roof of the pumping station, “and she was going, it was just like being on a ship at sea.”

Discovery of Superconductivity
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricSub Category: ResearchEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Kamerlingh Onnes Building, Leiden UniversityLeidenCountry: NetherlandsWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Discovery_of_Superconductivity,_1911Creator: Onne, Heike Kamerlingh

On 8 April 1911, Professor Heike Kamerlingh Onnes and his collaborators, Cornelis Dorsman, Gerrit Jan Flim, and Gilles Holst, discovered superconductivity.   They observed that the resistance of mercury approached  "practically zero" as its temperature was lowered to 3 kelvins.  Today, superconductivity makes many electrical technologies possible,  including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and high-energy particle accelerators.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Museum Boerhaave Image Caption: Today, superconductivity makes many electrical technologies possible, including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and high-energy particle accelerators.Era_date_from: 1911
Subscribe to 1910-1919

We hope you enjoyed this essay.

Please support this 70-year tradition of trusted historical writing and the volunteers that sustain it with a donation to American Heritage.

Donate

Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.