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Aviation

Agricultural Aviation
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: AviationEra: 1920sDateCreated: 1921Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry MuseumJacksonState: MSCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/agricultural-aviation-33.aspx

Agricultural Aviation Began In 1921 When C. R. Neillie Got A Military Plane To Dust Catalpa Trees Near Troy, OH. In 1922 B. R. Coad And C. E. Wollman Began Research At Tallulah, LA To Control Boll Weevils In Cotton. They Developed Equipment Using Venturi Induction, Ram Air Pressure And Hopper Agitation. G. B. Post And Wollman Made The First Commercial Dust Applications In Macon, Ga In 1924. In 1925, 18 Aircraft Treated 60,000 Acres Of Cotton Across The South. In 1928, Delta Air Service Was Organized.

YearAdded:
1995
Launch of a Skylark sounding rocket from Woomera in South Australia
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1940-1949RAAF Woomera Range ComplexWoomeraCountry: AustraliaWebsite: http://www.aiaa.org/AerospaceAmericaDecember2017/Creator: Royal Australian Air Force

Long Range Weapon Establishment

YearAdded:
2007
Image Caption: Launch of a Skylark sounding rocket from Woomera in South Australia
Huffman Prairie
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1904Pylon RdDaytonState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=15169

On this 84-acre meadow in 1904 and 1905, the Wright Brothers successfully mastered the mechanics of controlled, powered, heavier-than-air flight. The brothers also built the world’s first airport here, and in 1910 the Wright Company School of Aviation established a flying school on the site and trained many of the world’s first pilots, including some of the first military pilots, such as Thomas DeWitt Milling.

Image Credit: public domainImage Caption: Orville Wright in flight above Huffman Prairie, covering a distance of approximately 1,760 feet in 40 1/5 seconds, Nov. 16, 1904
airport of Getafe
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Getafe Air BaseGetafeCountry: SpainWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About_AIAA/News_Room/GetafeHistoricSitePR.pdf

Getafe Airfield was the site of the world’s first successful rotorcraft flight, on January 17, 1923. Lieutenant Alejandro Gómez Spencer piloted a C.4 Autogiro designed and built by Juan de la Cierva, who tested a series of autogiros between 1920 and 1924 at the Getafe site. Cierva’s autogiros introduced important technologies and flight techniques that led to the development of helicopters and other rotary wing aircraft.

 

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Miguel303xm (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Airplanes in the airport of Getafe, Getafe, Madrid
Pearson Field
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1905Pearson FieldVancouverState: WACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=13667

Pearson Field, named for U.S. Army Lt. Alexander Pearson Jr., a prominent early aviator who died in an airplane crash in 1925, is the oldest continuously operating airfield in the Pacific Northwest, and one of the oldest in the United States. In 1905, the field, then known as the Fort Vancouver Polo Grounds, was the landing site for a dirigible launched from the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exhibition in Portland, Ore. This marked the first crossing of the Columbia River by air, and the first time an airship was used to deliver a letter.

YearAdded:
2012
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/John Kloepper (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Pearson Field, in Vancouver Wa.
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903Kitty HawkState: NCCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/Creator: Wright, Wilbur, Wright, Orville

 On 19 August, the AIAA Historic Aerospace Sites Committee dedicated Kitty Hawk, NC, as a historic aerospace site, following a decades-long negotiation with the U.S Park Service. A historic marker was unveiled at a 0930 hrs ceremony as part of the First Flight Society’s National Aviation Day at Kitty Hawk. At this site on 17 December 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright achieved the first sustained, controlled heavier-than-air flight of an aircraft, opening a new era of transportation throughout the world.

Image Caption: Soaring flight, by Orville Wright, Kitty Hawk, NC, Oct, 1911.(10469 A.S.)
Link C-3 Flight Trainer
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Roberson Museum and Science Center

BinghamtonState: NYZip: 13905Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/210-link-c-3-flight-trainerCreator: Link, Edwin

During the 1920s, Edwin A. Link was employed in his father's organ building and repair business. He obtained his pilot's license in 1927 and became convinced that a mechanical device could be built as an inexpensive method to teach basic piloting. Link received three patents on his flight trainer (No. 1,825,462, March 12, 1930; No. 2,244,464, June 3, 1941; and No. 2,358,016, Sept. 12, 1944).

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Tony SpeerImage Caption: An early flight simulator representative of the first truly effective mechanical device used to simulate actual flight processes.Era_date_from: 1935
Newark Airport
Society: ASCEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1928 Liberty International Airport (EWR)NewarkState: NJZip: 07114Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Newark-Airport/Creator: Many

In May 1927, the same month of Charles A. Lindbergh's famous transatlantic flight from New York to Paris, a fact-finding commission appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Commerce concluded that Newark would be the ideal location for an airfield to serve the greater New York/New Jersey metropolitan area.

Civic leaders wasted no time; construction began on the Newark Airport in January 1928. Nine months and $1,750,000 later, 68 acres of soggy marshland had been filled and converted to an airport.

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Courtesy sections.asce.orgImage Caption: Newark AirportEra_date_from: 1928
Houston Municipal Airport Terminal
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1940William P. Hobby AirportHoustonState: TXZip: 77061Country: USAWebsite: http://www.aiaahouston.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Horizons_2013_01_and_02_pg_26_The_1940_Air_Terminal.pdfCreator: Finger, Joseph , Works Progress Administration

The terminal, designed by noted architect Joseph Finger and built by the Works Progress Administration, is a rare remaining example of classic art deco airport architecture, featuring the distinctive design elements of that age: step forms, sweeping curves, and intricate geometrical patterns and motifs. Opened on September 28, 1940, the terminal was Houston’s gateway to the world, and served the fleets of Braniff Airlines and Eastern Air Lines.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Mlickliter (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Houston Municipal Airport TerminalEra_date_from: 1940
Goodyear Airdock
Society: ASCEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929 Fulton International Airport (AKC)AkronState: OHZip: 44306Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Goodyear-Airdock/Creator: Arnstein, Karl , Wilbur Watson Engineering Company

Wind dynamics were a major consideration in building such a huge structure. When winds blow against the building, they are deflected up over the roof, creating a partial vacuum that can draw the roof up with a force several times greater than the direct force of the wind. Wind tunnel testing on a model helped designers decide that a semi-parabolic shape would best resolve air current concerns.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Goodyear AirdockEra_date_from: 1929
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