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Air-Inflated, Double-Layer Polyethylene Greenhouse
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StructuresEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Foran HallNew BrunswickState: NJZip: 08901Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/air-inflated-double-layer-polyethylene-greenhouse-44.aspxCreator: Roberts, William J.

A crucial step in the evolution of modern plant agriculture was the development of low-cost, energy-efficient greenhouse structures that provide optimum growing conditions year-round. In 1964, Professor William J. Roberts developed the first air-inflated double-layer polyethylene greenhouse covering system at Cook College, Rutgers University.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dwight Sipler (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: A cat scales an air-inflated double-layered polyethylene greenhouse
RIM-8 Talos surface to air missile built by Bendix Corporation in test launcher at White Sands Missile Range New Mexico
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationBendix Aviation CorporationTeterboroState: NJCountry: USACreator: Bendix, Vincent

This site, originally the home of the Eclipse-Pioneer Division of the Bendix Aviation Corporation, has produced navigational instruments and engine components since 1938.  Providing instruments that flew with Lindbergh across the Atlantic, and Admiral Byrd in the cold of Antarctica; from guiding American pilots in times of peace and war, to putting men on the moon, the “Bendix Invisible Crew” has been a leader in innovation and technology in the world of aviation and space exploration.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Caption: RIM-8 Talos surface to air missile built by Bendix Corporation in test launcher at White Sands Missile Range New Mexico
Picatinny Arsenal
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1880sDateCreated: 1880Picatinny ArsenalWhartonState: NJCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.newjerseyhills.com/historic-aerospace-designation-awarded-to-picatinny-arsenal/article_8372debc-a6a3-5d90-b45b-fa72038510f4.html, https://www.aiaa.org/Creator: U.S. War Department

Built in 1880 as the Piccatinny Powder Depot, this site was the major supplier of smokeless powder to the military for many years.

YearAdded:
2006
James Hart Wyld
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930sDenvilleState: NJCountry: USAWebsite: https://arc.aiaa.org/doi/book/10.2514/4.104428Creator: Wyld, James Hart, Lovell Lawrence, Pendray, George Edward, Pierce, Hugh, Shesta, John

The first company in the United States dedicated solely to the production of the liquid rocket engine, Reaction Motors, Inc. (RMI) was formed in 1941.  Its four founders were rocket enthusiasts and members of the American Rocket Society. RMI developed the rocket motors that powered the first supersonic flight, that of the X-1; the retro rockets for five NASA surveyor lunar soft landers; and prepackaged liquid rocket engines for the U.S. Navy Bullpup A & B air to ground missiles, among many other pioneering programs.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Smithsonian InstitutionImage Caption: James Wyld, one of the RMI founders, holding a rocket motor at an ARS test in Midvale, New Jersey, 1941.
Newark Airport
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1920sDateCreated: 19283 Brewster RdnewarkState: NJCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/newark-airport/

In May 1927, the same month of Charles A. Lindbergh's famous transatlantic flight from New York to Paris, a fact-finding commission appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Commerce concluded that Newark would be the ideal location for an airfield to serve the greater New York/New Jersey metropolitan area.

Civic leaders wasted no time; construction began on the Newark Airport in January 1928. Nine months and $1,750,000 later, 68 acres of soggy marshland had been filled and converted to an airport.

Image Caption: "(D)etails of traffic control have been so completely worked out as to eliminate any possible conflict between scheduled air line operations and racing activities..." 
 - Major John Berry, An Air Terminal Extraordinary, 1930
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1838Historic Speedwell ParkMorristownState: NJZip: 07960Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Demonstration_of_Practical_Telegraphy,_1838Creator: Morse, Samuel F. B., Vail, Alfred
In January 1838, Samuel F. B. Morse and Alfred Vail first demonstrated publicly crucial elements of their telegraph system, using instruments that Vail had constructed during the previous months. Electrical pulses, transmitted through two miles of wire, caused an electromagnet to ink dots and dashes (grouped to represent letters and words) on a strip of paper. Commercialization began in 1844 when funding became available. A ministerial student, a professor of fine arts, and a prominent industrialist...
YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: The original Samuel Morse telegraphEra_date_from: 1838
Hydraulic-Inclined Plane System of the Morris Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1824-1836Phillipsburg to Newark BayState: NJCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/hydraulic-powered-inclined-plane-system-of-the-morris-canal/

Morris Canal was built to transport coal from the Lehigh Valley of Pennsylvania to industrial markets in Newark and New York. The total length of the canal was 106 miles. The canal climbed an astonishing 914 feet from Newark Bay to the summit at Lake Hopatcong, and then dropped 760 feet to the Delaware River at Phillipsburg. This gave the canal an average vertical slope of 18 feet per mile, steep compared to the contemporary Erie Canal's relatively gentle slope of one foot per mile.  

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy ASCEImage Caption: The Hydraulic-Inclined Plane System gave the Morris Canal an average vertical slope of 18 feet per mile. Era_date_from: 1824
Fink Through Truss Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1858HamdenState: NJZip: 08801Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Fink-Through-Truss-Bridge/

"Fink's truss design was one of a number of early patented solutions to [the problem of how] to carry a massive, moving weight (a train) over long spans (to avoid the expense of building piers and obstructing waterways) on easily erected bridges (often in rough terrain) with good long-term economy..." 
 - Kent Farnow Smith, "America's Oldest Functioning Iron-Truss Bridge," 1978

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Library of CongressImage Caption: This bridge is an example of the Fink truss, the most efficient solution to building long-span bridges quickly and economically during its time.Era_date_from: 1858
Northampton Street Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1896Delaware RiverEastonState: NJZip: 18042Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/People-and-Projects/Projects/Landmarks/Northampton-Street-Bridge/Creator: Palmer, Timothy

The crossing of the Delaware River at Easton, Pennsylvania, provided a central link in travel from the northeastern seaboard to America's inland territories throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries. From 1806 to the mid-1890s, travelers used a landmark wooden structure built by noted bridge-builder Timothy Palmer. By the 1880s, however, Palmer's three-span covered bridge could no longer handle the demands of traffic generated by new trolley lines.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Northampton Street BridgeEra_date_from: 1896
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