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1890-1899

Bunker Hill Covered Bridge
Main Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 18954160 US-70State: NCZip: 28610Country: USAWebsite: https://catawbahistory.org/bunker-hill-covered-bridgeCreator: Andrew L. Ramsour

Bunker Hill Bridge is the only surviving Haupt truss bridge in the U.S. and one of only two surviving covered bridges in North Carolina. Patented in 1839, the Haupt truss featured diagonal braces spanning multiple panels, which was an attempt to eliminate the cross-strain found in lattice truss bridges. Although it was almost immediately eclipsed by the Howe truss and never reached the mainstream of covered bridge building, the Haupt truss is of interest for its association with Gen.

Image Credit: Catawba County Historical Association
The First Flaked Cereal
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1894Willard Public LibraryBattle CreekState: MIZip: 49017Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/the-first-flaked-cereal-52.aspxCreator: Kellogg, John Harvey

In 1894, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and his brother, Will Keith (W.K.) Kellogg, were making a granola type cereal for their patients in the Battle Creek Sanitarium, a general health facility in Michigan. This granola cereal was made from wheat that was boiled, rolled into a sheet, toasted, and ground. They accidentally left a batch of boiled wheat stand overnight before passing it through the rolls. The individual grains were subsequently pressed into flakes which were toasted to form the first flaked cereal. Two years later, W.K. Kellogg made the first corn flakes.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Public Domain
Luebben Round Baler
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1892Pioneer VillageMindenState: NEZip: 68959Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/luebben-round-baler-31.aspxCreator: Luebben, Hugh

Luebben Hay Baler - Historic Landmark of Agricultural Engineering. In 1892, Hugh Luebben from Sutton, Nebraska, with sons Melchior and Ummo built a mobile machine to produce round hay bales between two sets of rotating flat belts. They began manufacturing the baler in 1909 in Beatrice and later moved to Omaha, Nebraska. Allis-Chalmers purchased the patent in 1939 and eventually sold 77,200 "Roto-Balers." The Luebben baler made handling easier, improved hay quality, and reduced costs. The same basic design is used on modern large round balers.

YearAdded:
1993
Internal Combustion Tractor
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1892Floyd County MuseumCharles CityState: IAZip: 50616Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/internal-combustion-tractor-35.aspxCreator: Froehlich, John H.

In 1892, John H. Froehlich, Froehlich, IA, Mounted A Gasoline Fueled Internal Combustion Engine On A Traction Geared Frame And Used It To Power A Threshing Machine. A Change In Power Source Had Begun On North American Farms. In 1892, The Case Co., Racine, Wi, Built An Experimental Gas Traction Engine. In 1898 A Patent Was Issued To The Van Duzen Co. Cincinnati, OH, For A Gasoline Traction Engine. Huber Mnfg., Marion, Oh, Bought This Patent In 1898 And Produced 30 Prototype Units. In 1902, Hart-Parr, Founded By Charles W. Hart And Charles H.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy WikiCommons/RifeIdeas (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Floyd County Museum, which houses an early model of the Hart-Parr tractor
Corn Silage Harvester
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1892Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering BuildingFalcon HeightsState: MNZip: 55108Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/corn-silage-harvester-26.aspx

Charles C. Fenno Of Grinnell, Ia, Patented The First Field Corn Silage Harvester On April 19, 1892. His Ground-Powered Machine Cut The Corn Plant And Fed The Tassel End First To A Rotary Cutter. Joseph Weigel Of Flandreau, Sd, Improved Fenno's Harvester In 1912 By Adding An Engine To Power The Cutter And By Feeding The Stalks Butt End First. Andrean And Adolph Ronning, Farmers Of Boyd, Mn Patented Further Improvements In 1915. In 1918 The American Harvester Co. Of Minneapolis, Mn, Began Manufacturing The Horse-Drawn Ronning Harvester Using Weigel's Patent Too.

YearAdded:
1992
Columbia Dry Cell Battery
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1896Energizer Holdings, Inc. corporate headquartersSt. LouisState: MOCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/drycellbattery.htmlCreator: Lawrence, Washington H.

Imagine a world without batteries. It would be a much different world, in which the automobile and the telephone would have developed differently and probably later, a world without many of the conveniences of modern life and without some of the necessities. The battery, ever smaller and more powerful, defines much of our modern comforts and advances. There were many scientific and technological advances on the way to those smaller and more powerful batteries.

YearAdded:
2005
Image Credit: Courtesy Duke UniversityImage Caption: Columbia Batteries: The World's Standard

Sometime in 1894, while his Great Lakes steamer W. P. Thew lay tied to a Cuyahoga River wharf in northeast Ohio, 48-year-old Capt. Richard P. Thew, failed farmer and hardware salesman, observed a railroad steam shovel take one clumsy scoop of ore after another from the heap on the wood docks and dump them into a hopper car sitting on nearby railroad tracks. He noticed that the shovel bucket’s teeth gouged the dock’s timbers and left much of the ore behind.

THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER STOOD AT THE CENTER, literally and figuratively, of the United States’s westward expansion during the nineteenth century. By far the most prominent name in taming the powerful river was James Buchanan Eads. From the 1830s through the 1850s this supremely capable engineer salvaged hundreds of wrecks with a series of ever-larger diving bells, gaining in the process an intimate knowledge of the river’s bottom.

Richard p thewSometime in 1894, while his Great Lakes steamer W P. Thew lay tied to a wharf on the banks of the Cuyahoga River in northeast Ohio, Capt. Richard P. Thew whiled away many hours as men laboriously unloaded his iron ore cargo onto the wooden docks.

Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1890Institut Catholique de ParisParisZip: 75006Country: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Discovery_of_Radioconduction_by_Edouard_Branly,_1890Creator: Branly, Edouard
The discovery of the radioconduction is a phenomenon which revolutionized the means of communication. It is at the origin of the development of the TSF (Télégraphie Sans Fil, or wireless telegraphy). As a member of the French Academy of Sciences (it gains vis-a-vis Marie Curie), Branly received international recognition. No more than about fifteen years separate the first wireless transmission across a few meters (1890) from the first transatlantic communication (Marconi, December 1901).
YearAdded:
2010
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: Edouard BranlyEra_date_from: 1890
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