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1998

Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1880sDateCreated: 1885John Deere Des Moines WorksAnkenyState: IAZip: 50023Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/shielded-snapping-rolls-for-corn-harvesting-36.aspx

In 1850, E. W. Quincy of Illinois patented an open-roll ear-snapping mechanism. A series of innovations led to corn heads for combines. Harvesting corn with corn pickers using open rolls on corn pickers after 1925 proved to be dangerous as farmers often needed to clear stalks from the rolls. In 1885, E. M. Aiken, Dawson, ND, patented shielded snapping rolls with flat plates above the rolls. C. K Shedd and E. V. Collins, Ames, IA, patented a more aggressive shielded snapping device in 1941 which was later used on sweet corn pickers.

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1998
Internal Combustion Tractor
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1892Floyd County MuseumCharles CityState: IAZip: 50616Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/internal-combustion-tractor-35.aspxCreator: Froehlich, John H.

In 1892, John H. Froehlich, Froehlich, IA, Mounted A Gasoline Fueled Internal Combustion Engine On A Traction Geared Frame And Used It To Power A Threshing Machine. A Change In Power Source Had Begun On North American Farms. In 1892, The Case Co., Racine, Wi, Built An Experimental Gas Traction Engine. In 1898 A Patent Was Issued To The Van Duzen Co. Cincinnati, OH, For A Gasoline Traction Engine. Huber Mnfg., Marion, Oh, Bought This Patent In 1898 And Produced 30 Prototype Units. In 1902, Hart-Parr, Founded By Charles W. Hart And Charles H.

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1998
Image Credit: Courtesy WikiCommons/RifeIdeas (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Floyd County Museum, which houses an early model of the Hart-Parr tractor
Era: 1940sDateCreated: 1942Baton Rouge RefineryBaton RougeState: LACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/fluidbedreactor.htmlCreator: Standard Oil Corporation of New Jersey [now Exxon Corporation]

The first commercial circulating fluid bed reactor, PCLA #1 (Powdered Catalyst Louisiana), went on stream on May 25, 1942, in the Baton Rouge Refinery of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey (now ExxonMobil Corporation). This first use of powdered catalysts in continuous operation allowed the efficient cracking of heavy gas oils to meet the growing demand for high-octane fuels. Today, fluid bed reactors are in use worldwide for the manufacture of fuels, chemical intermediates and plastics.

The plaque commemorating the development reads:

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy ACS/Keith LindblomImage Caption: National Historic Chemical Landmark plaque installed at the site of the PCLA #1 at ExxonMobil’s Baton Rouge Refinery.
Tehachapi Pass Railroad Line
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1876WalongState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Tehachapi-Pass-Railroad-Line/Creator: Harris, J. B. , Southern Pacific Railroad

The Tehachapi Pass Railroad Line was cut through solid and decomposed granite by about 3,000 Chinese laborers using nothing more than picks, shovels, horse drawn carts, and blasting powder. This line, which rises from the San Joaquin Valley and through the Tehachapi Mountains, originally included 18 tunnels, ten bridges and several water towers to accommodate the steam locomotives. Completed in less than two years, it was part of the final line of the first railroad to connect San Francisco with Los Angeles.

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1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug WertmanImage Caption: Tehachapi Pass Railroad LineEra_date_from: 1876
Siegfried Marcus Car
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, RoadSub Category: Road TransportationEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: ca. 1875Technical Museum
ViennaCountry: AustriaWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/road-and-off-road-transportation/-203-siegfried-marcus-car-%28ca--1875%29Creator: Marcus, Siegfried

Siegfried Marcus (1833-1898), a remarkable engineer and manufacturer, lived most of his life and died in Vienna, leaving his most important legacy — an experimental automobile resembling today's modern car and the oldest extant automobile known worldwide. Marcus' second car, built circa 1875 (a more specific date still being investigated by historians), is believed to be the first vehicle powered by a four-cycle engine and the first to use gasoline as a fuel, featuring the first carburetor for a gasoline engine and the first magneto ignition.

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1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Siegfried Marcus CarEra_date_from: ca. 1875
Paddle Steamer Uri
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1901Lake Navigation CompanyLucerneCountry: SwitzerlandWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-200-paddle-steamer-uri-%281901%29Creator: Sulzer brothers of Winterthur

This is the oldest operating vessel with a diagonal, compound steam engine, with disc valve gear. Operating at a higher pressure than the oscillating-cylinder engines then used in lake steamers, this type of engine was more powerful and efficient, as well as smaller. The compound engine, built by Sulzer brothers of Winterthur, uses super-heated steam from the boilers in two stages-high and low pressure-before exhausting it into a condenser. The engine produces 650 horsepower, turning two paddle wheels.

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1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Coronado1992 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Paddle Steamer UriEra_date_from: 1901
Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1864North CanalNorth AndoverState: MAZip: 01845Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Moseley-Wrought-Iron-Arch-Bridge/Creator: Moseley Iron Building Works

Designed, patented, and built by Thomas W.H. Moseley, this arched 96-foot span bridge preceded by years the standard use of wrought iron for bridges. For the first time in the United States, Moseley incorporated the use of riveted wrought-iron plates for the triangular-shaped top chord.

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1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Elizabeth Thomsen (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Moseley Arch, Merrimack College, North Andover, MassachusettsEra_date_from: 1864
Havemeyer Hall
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Columbia UniversityNew YorkState: NYZip: 10027Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/havemeyerhall.htmlCreator: Chandler, Charles Frederick , McKim, Charles Follen

Havemeyer Hall was built between 1896 and 1898 under the leadership of Charles Frederick Chandler. It provided research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in industrial, inorganic, organic, physical, and biological chemistry. Pioneering research done here led to the discovery of deuterium, for which Harold Clayton Urey received the Nobel Prize in 1934. Six others who did research here subsequently received the Nobel Prize, including Irving Langmuir, the first industrial chemist to be so honored, in 1932.

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1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Havemeyer HallEra_date_from: 1898
Gota Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1810 to 1832Götakanal
AleN
GothenburgState: Västra Götaland CountyCountry: SwedenWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Gota-Canal/Creator: von Platen, Baltzer, Telford, Thomas

The Gota Canal is the biggest infrastructure project ever built in Sweden. The canal was dug by hand with shovels made of wood. It took over 22 years of 12-hour days - an estimated 12 million man-days of labor - to complete the project.  

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1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Patrick Strandberg (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Gota CanalEra_date_from: 1810 to 1832
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1939Taylor Blvd
B
BethesdaState: MDZip: 20817Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-197-david-taylor-model-basin-%281939%29Creator: Taylor, David
The David Taylor Model Basin is among the largest facilities of its kind in the world, containing a shallow water basin, a deep water basin and a high-speed basin. Using its sophisticated combination of towing carriages, wave makers, and measuring equipment, engineers are able to determine the sea-keeping qualities and propulsion characteristics of ship and craft models up to 40 feet in length. Since it became operational, the facility has provided key support in the development of naval architecture for the Navy, the Coast Guard, the Maritime Administration, and the maritime industry.
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1998
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Navy)Image Caption: David Taylor Model BasinEra_date_from: 1939
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