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Automobile

Siegfried Marcus Car
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, RoadSub Category: Road TransportationEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: ca. 1875Technical Museum
ViennaCountry: AustriaWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/road-and-off-road-transportation/-203-siegfried-marcus-car-%28ca--1875%29Creator: Marcus, Siegfried

Siegfried Marcus (1833-1898), a remarkable engineer and manufacturer, lived most of his life and died in Vienna, leaving his most important legacy — an experimental automobile resembling today's modern car and the oldest extant automobile known worldwide. Marcus' second car, built circa 1875 (a more specific date still being investigated by historians), is believed to be the first vehicle powered by a four-cycle engine and the first to use gasoline as a fuel, featuring the first carburetor for a gasoline engine and the first magneto ignition.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Siegfried Marcus CarEra_date_from: ca. 1875
Newell Shredder
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Solid WasteEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1969Newell IndustriesSan AntonioState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/solid-waste/-179-newell-shredder-%281969%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/2c664309-172d-48d9-a822-5327e310a107/179-Newell-Shredder-1969.aspxCreator: Newell, Alton

This machine, designed by Alton S. Newell, efficiently reduced automobile bodies into scrap metal for recycling. A body was fed into the shredder at a controlled rate, and rotating hammers, driven by a 500-hp motor, shredded it into small pieces that were easily shipped. The process took about 10 minutes a car and used less energy than other shredding and crushing machines. 

YearAdded:
1994
Image Caption: Newell ShredderEra_date_from: 1969
A.O. Smith Automatic Frame Plant
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1920Milwaukee, WICountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/37-a-o-smith-automatic-frame-plantCreator: A.O. Smith Corporation

In 1899, during the earliest days of the automobile revolution, A. O. Smith developed a new, lightweight steel car frame. Within a few short years, he was selling these frames to a “who’s who” of car makers including Cadillac, Oldsmobile, and Ford. A. O. Smith’s son, Lloyd Raymond, carried on the family company, expanding the automotive business and introducing the world’s first automated frame production line, the Mechanical Marvel.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: ASMEImage Caption: The entire line at the A. O. Smith Automatic Frame Plant was controlled by the man on the bridge. The long, intricate assembling process completed itself practically without human aid.Era_date_from: 1920
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