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Watkins Woolen Mill
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1868Watkins Woolen Mill State ParkKearneyState: MOZip: 64060Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-43-watkins-woolen-mill-%281868%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/705d5611-da21-47b3-b584-1e33e1c0b9df/43-Watkins-Woolen-Mill.aspxCreator: Watkins, Waltus

The Watkins Woolen Mill is among the best preserved examples of a Midwest woolen mill in nineteenth-century United States. Its machinery for preparing, spinning, and weaving wool reflects the existence of well-established textile industry in the country. It was designed and built by Waltus L. Watkins (1806-1884), a machinist and master weaver from Frankfort, Kentucky, who began operating his mill in 1861 in Clay County.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Watkins Woolen MillEra_date_from: 1868
Newell Shredder
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Solid WasteEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1969Newell IndustriesSan AntonioState: TXCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/solid-waste/-179-newell-shredder-%281969%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/2c664309-172d-48d9-a822-5327e310a107/179-Newell-Shredder-1969.aspxCreator: Newell, Alton

This machine, designed by Alton S. Newell, efficiently reduced automobile bodies into scrap metal for recycling. A body was fed into the shredder at a controlled rate, and rotating hammers, driven by a 500-hp motor, shredded it into small pieces that were easily shipped. The process took about 10 minutes a car and used less energy than other shredding and crushing machines. 

YearAdded:
1994
Image Caption: Newell ShredderEra_date_from: 1969
Joshua Hendy Iron Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1906401 E Hendy AveSunnyvaleState: CAZip: 94086Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-34-joshua-hendy-iron-works-%281906%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/4c99ebb6-8005-461a-a215-0af2f8eaf17c/34-Joshua-Hendy-Iron-Works.aspxCreator: Hendy, Joshua

This ironworks exemplified the adaptability required for industrial survival in a dynamic technical environment. It was a major western producer of mechanical equipment used in mining (especially large hydraulic machines), ship propulsion, irrigation, power generation, optical telescope mounts, and nuclear research.

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Public DomainImage Caption: Joshua Hendy Iron WorksEra_date_from: 1906
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1859202 Museum LaneTitusvilleState: PAZip: 16354Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-40-drake-oil-well-%281859%29Creator: Drake, Edwin
The drilling of this oil well marks the modern phase of the petroleum industry. A series of revolutionary technological changes, unforeseen even by the most prophetic, followed. Drake demonstrated practical oil recovery by applying salt-well drilling techniques, including the use of the derrick, and invented the modern method of driving iron pipe. While excavation for oil dates back to the 1500s in this area, its uses were not explored until the 1800s. It was first sold as a curative potion and then developed into a illuminant by the 1850s.
YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Zamoose (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Drake Oil WellEra_date_from: 1859
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