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1960-1969

Universal Soil Loss Equation
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1965National Soil Erosion Research LabWest LafayetteState: INZip: 47907Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/universal-soil-loss-equation-41.aspx

The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) was developed at the USDA National Runoff and Soil Loss Data Center at Purdue University in a national effort led by Walter H. Wischmeier and Dwight D. Smith. The USLE was published in 1965 in USDA Agriculture Handbook 282.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Caption: The Universal Soil Loss Equation for estimating average annual soil erosion.

A = average annual soil loss (in tons/acre)
R = rainfall erosivity index
K = soil erodibility factor
LS = topographic factor
C = cropping factor
P = conservation practice factor
Once-Over Mechanical Harvesting of Cucumbers
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1963Farrall Agricultural Engineering HallEast LansingState: MIZip: 48824Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/the-once-over-mechanical-harvesting-of-cucumbers-55.aspxCreator: Bill Stout

The concept of once-over mechanical, as opposed to multiple-pick hand or experimental multiple-pick machine harvesting, represented a major break-through in the practice of producing vine fruit such as pickling cucumbers.  In the 1950s the cost of hand harvesting was as high as 50% of the production cost.  Once-over mechanical harvesting, coupled with increasing plant population, reduced this cost to 25% thereby making production economically viable.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Caption: The concept represented a major break-through in the practice of producing vine fruit such as pickling cucumbers.
ASABE Headquarters
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1969ASABE HeadquatersSt. JosephState: MIZip: 49085Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/asabe-hq-47.aspx

Established in 1907, the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE) was managed by volunteers. In 1925, local editor Raymond Olney was named secretary, thus establishing ASAE in this area. By 1969, with over 7,000 members in 100 countries, an ASAE building was constructed at this site in St. Joseph, Mi. In 2005, ASAE became ASABE to recognize the importance of biology in the profession. ASABE collects and maintains the unique body of knowledge for the agricultural/biological engineering profession.

YearAdded:
2007
Air-Inflated, Double-Layer Polyethylene Greenhouse
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StructuresEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Foran HallNew BrunswickState: NJZip: 08901Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/air-inflated-double-layer-polyethylene-greenhouse-44.aspxCreator: Roberts, William J.

A crucial step in the evolution of modern plant agriculture was the development of low-cost, energy-efficient greenhouse structures that provide optimum growing conditions year-round. In 1964, Professor William J. Roberts developed the first air-inflated double-layer polyethylene greenhouse covering system at Cook College, Rutgers University.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dwight Sipler (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: A cat scales an air-inflated double-layered polyethylene greenhouse

As long as there are history books, Neil Armstrong will be in them.

In May 1961, President John F. Kennedy had committed the nation “to achieving the goal, before the decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to Earth.” On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong commanded the Apollo 11 mission that simultaneously ended the Soviet-American space race and met America’s goal with more than five months to spare.

Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1963PR-625AreciboState: PRZip: 00612Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/216-arecibo-radiotelescope

A drive system that keeps the antenna pointed with millimeter precision regardless of factors such as environmental change

 

The Arecibo Observatory has the largest radio telescope ever constructed.  Maintaining the greatest electromagnetic wave gathering capacity of any telescope, it has been an essential tool in modern astronomy, ionosphere and planetary studies.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Public DomainImage Caption: Arecibo Radiotelescope
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1968ILC DoverFredericaState: DEZip: 1996-2080Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/255-apollo-space-suit, https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/ResourceFiles/AboutASME/Who%20We%20Are/Engineering%20History/Landmarks/ApolloBR.pdf

Apollo astronauts who ventured outside of the protective confines of their pressurized capsules faced a number of hazards, among them: exposure to cosmic debris, solar radiation, and surface temperatures that widely varied. The suit also needed to accommodate a wide range of motion to allow the duties of the missions to be successfully accomplished.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Credit: Public Domain - Take by Neil ArmstrongImage Caption: Edwin Aldrin wearing the A7L spacesuit on the moon.
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1960491 Dutton St #2LowellState: MAZip: 01854Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/251-19th-century-textile-tools-and-machinery

Referred to as the "catalyst of the Industrial Revolution," textile manufacturing helped to transform the American economy from an agricultural to a manufacturing economy. It led to transitions from human to mechanical power and from wood to metal construction. Population shifts resulted from significant numbers of people moving from rural areas to work in urban factories. The collection of tools and machinery housed at the American Textile History Museum (ATHM) represents a collection of ideas which developed during this period.

YearAdded:
2012
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Z22Image Caption: Throstle frame in Lowell, Massachusetts.
First Transpacific Reception of a Television (TV) Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1963Ibaraki Satellite Communication CenterTakahagiZip: 318-0022Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transpacific_Reception_of_a_Television_%28TV%29_Signal_via_Satellite,_1963

On 23 November 1963, this site received the first transpacific transmission of a TV signal from Mojave earth station in California, U.S.A., via the Relay 1 communications satellite. The Ibaraki earth station used a 20m Cassegrain antenna, the first use of this type of antenna for commercial telecommunications. This event demonstrated the capability and impact of satellite communications and helped open a new era of intercontinental live TV programming relayed via satellite.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Caption: Artist's vision of NASA Relay 1 satelliteEra_date_from: 1963
First Transatlantic Reception of a Television Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Parc du Radôme
Pleumeur-BodouCountry: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transatlantic_Reception_of_a_Television_Signal_via_Satellite,_1962

On 11 July 1962 a station in Pimsleur-Bodou received the first transatlantic transmission of a TV signal from a twin station in Andover, Maine, USA via the TELSTAR satellite. The success of TELSTAR and the earth stations, the first built for active satellite communications, illustrated the potential of a future world-wide satellite system to provide communications between continents.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Nicholas Lannuzel (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radome in Pimsleur-Bodou.Era_date_from: 1962
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