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Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1968ILC DoverFredericaState: DEZip: 1996-2080Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/255-apollo-space-suit, https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/ResourceFiles/AboutASME/Who%20We%20Are/Engineering%20History/Landmarks/ApolloBR.pdf

Apollo astronauts who ventured outside of the protective confines of their pressurized capsules faced a number of hazards, among them: exposure to cosmic debris, solar radiation, and surface temperatures that widely varied. The suit also needed to accommodate a wide range of motion to allow the duties of the missions to be successfully accomplished.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Credit: Public Domain - Take by Neil ArmstrongImage Caption: Edwin Aldrin wearing the A7L spacesuit on the moon.
New Castle Ice Harbor
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1794Ice Harbor
Delaware 19709
New CastleState: DECountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/New-Castle-Ice-Harbor/Creator: Delafield, Richard

In 1794, the Delaware legislature authorized a lottery to fund the erection of ice piers in the harbor at New Castle. The ice harbor was designed to protect anchored ships from storms and ice. At the time, New Castle served as the principal winter port for ships from the Port of Philadelphia because ice on the Delaware River posed such a serious hazard to the wooden-hulled vessels. The harbor was the first of its type on the river and the last one to be maintained as the need for them declined. It served as a model for the other four harbors constructed in the area.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Caption: New Castle Ice HarborEra_date_from: 1794
Chesapeake and Delaware Canal
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1829Chesapeake and Delaware CanalNew CastleState: DEZip: 19701Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/chesapeake---delaware-canal/Creator: Wright, Benjamin, White, Canvass

The Chesapeake & Delaware Canal is the only canal built in 19th-century America that still operates today as a major shipping route. Connecting the Port of Baltimore and Upper Chesapeake Bay with the mouth of the Delaware River and the Port of Philadelphia, the canal was one of the first civil engineering projects proposed in the New World and one of the most difficult to carry out. Although only 14 miles long, the canal's original cost made it one of the most expensive canals ever built in America.  

YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy Flickr/Lee Cannon (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Chesapeake and Delaware CanalEra_date_from: 1829
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1803-1921Brandywine RiverWilmingtonState: DEZip: 19807Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---2/-221-brandywine-river-powder-mills-%281803-1921%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/3133.pdfCreator: du Pont, Eleuthère Irénéé
Founded by Eleuthère Irénéé du Pont (1771-1834), the Brandywine River Mills became the largest maker of explosive black powder in the United States. That success resulted directly from the firm's pioneering use of gunpowder processing machinery driven by water wheels and water turbines.
YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Harvey Barrison (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: On of the waterwheels belonging to the Brandywine River Powder MillsEra_date_from: 1803
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