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2013

Original USDA-ARS Experimental Watersheds
Society: ASABEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Drainage & WatershedEra: 1940sDateCreated: 1942Agricultural Engineering Building - Ohio State UniversityColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/original-usda-ars-experimental-watersheds-58.aspx, https://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/12341/PDF

In the mid 1930's, the USDA Soil Conservation Service (SCS) realized the importance of hydrologic processes on agricultural fields and watersheds and determining their impact on soil erosion, floods, water resources, and the agricultural economy. In response, the SCS Hydrologic Division established experimental watersheds in Coshocton, Ohio, Hastings, Nebraska, and Riesel, Texas, and operated them until 1954 when the watersheds were transferred to the newly created Agricultural Research Service (ARS). 

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2013
Image Caption: Active experimental watersheds and rain gauges at the USDA‐
ARS Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory near Riesel, Texas.
Noble Blade Cultivator
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1937Nobleford Centennial ParkNoblefordZip: AB T0L 1S0Country: CanadaWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/noble-blade-cultivator-46.aspxCreator: Noble, Charles S.

In the 1930's thousands of acres of land were rendered unproductive through wind erosion because of drought, tillage, and dust mulch farming practices. Charles S. Noble, of Nobleford, Alberta, invented a cultivator that sheared stubble and weeds below the ground surface, leaving residue on the soil to reduce evaporation and prevent erosion by strong Alberta winds. The Noble Blade Cultivator was patented in 1937. The Noble family subsequently developed a variety of straight and V-blade cultivators.

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2013
Cierva C.8W
1155 Easton RdHorshamState: PACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=18153Creator: Pitcairn, Harold F.

On December 18, 1928, Arthur Rawson, a factory pilot for the Cierva Autogiro Company, and then Harold F. Pitcairn, flew a Cierva C.8W Autogiro from Building #3 at Pitcairn Field #2. The flights marked the first time a rotary-wing aircraft was successfully flown in the U.S.

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2013
Image Caption: Cierva C.8W
Mellon Institute of Industrial Research,
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: EducationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 19374400 Fifth AvePittsburghState: PACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/mellon-institute.html

Prior to its merger with the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1967 to form Carnegie Mellon University, the nonprofit Mellon Institute for Industrial Research was a major, independent research corporation dedicated to promoting applied research for industry and educating scientific researchers for the benefit of society as a whole. The Institute educated hundreds of fellows for careers in industrial research and helped to sell the very idea of research to manufacturers.

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2013
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Piotrus (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Mellon Institute, CMU
Roy Teranishi
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalDateCreated: 1956Western Regional Research CenterAlbanyState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/usda-flavor-chemistry.htmlCreator: Western Regional Research Center

Flavor—encompassing both aroma and taste—provides the defining characteristic of how we experience food. Flavor has long been an enigma to scientists: Aristotle described two categories of taste, sweet and bitter. Today we recognize five basic tastes in food: sweetness, saltiness, sourness, bitterness and umami (savory). But what are the scientific components of flavor, and how can flavor be studied, quantified and replicated?

 

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2013
Image Credit: Photo by USDA-ARImage Caption: Roy Teranishi samples the headspace over fresh grapes before injecting a sample into a gas chromatograph.
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1907Titan Crane Clydebank RebuiltClydebankZip: G81 1BFCountry: ScotlandWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/253-titan-craneCreator: Hunter, Adam

The largest crane of the hammer-head or Titan' type, and the earliest s

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2013
Image Credit: Courtesy Thomas Nugest (CC BY-SA 2.0)
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 19691500 N. McClintock Dr.TempeState: AZZip: 85281Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/252-big-surf-waterpark, https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/ResourceFiles/AboutASME/Who%20We%20Are/Engineering%20History/Landmarks/252-Big-Surf-Waterpark.pdf, http://bigsurffun.com/Creator: Dexter, Phil

The first wave pool in North America to consistently generate 3-5 foot spilling waves suitable for surfing

Big Surf Waterpark uses 15 gates that empty water into a 2.5 acre lagoon with contours that replicate a natural beach. Waves are produced by pumping water to a pre-selected height and released through underwater gates. The water released breaks over a baffle (similar to a natural reef), forming one wave per cycle. Water is recirculated to the lagoon through pumps.

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2013
Image Caption: Designed by Phil Dexter, the facility uses 15 gates that empty water from a reservoir into a 2.5 million gallon lagoon with contours that replicate a natural beach.
Batavia Windmills
Society: ASMEEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1863155 Houston StBataviaState: ILZip: 60510Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/254-batavia-windmills
Collection of restored windmill operated waterpumps made at one of the three windmill manufacturing companies in Batavia.
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2013
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Fuzzy Gerdes (CC BY 2.0)
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1968ILC DoverFredericaState: DEZip: 1996-2080Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/255-apollo-space-suit, https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/ResourceFiles/AboutASME/Who%20We%20Are/Engineering%20History/Landmarks/ApolloBR.pdf

Apollo astronauts who ventured outside of the protective confines of their pressurized capsules faced a number of hazards, among them: exposure to cosmic debris, solar radiation, and surface temperatures that widely varied. The suit also needed to accommodate a wide range of motion to allow the duties of the missions to be successfully accomplished.

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2013
Image Credit: Public Domain - Take by Neil ArmstrongImage Caption: Edwin Aldrin wearing the A7L spacesuit on the moon.
Drake Oil Well
Society: SPEMain Category: PetroleumSub Category: ExtractionEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1859202 Museum LaneTitusvilleState: PAZip: 16354Country: USAWebsite: http://www.spe.org/Creator: Drake, Edwin

The drilling of this oil well marks the modern phase of the petroleum industry. A series of revolutionary technological changes, unforeseen even by the most prophetic, followed. Drake demonstrated practical oil recovery by applying salt-well drilling techniques, including the use of the derrick, and invented the modern method of driving iron pipe.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Zamoose (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Drake Oil WellEra_date_from: 1859
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