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New Holland Baler
Society: ASABE Main Category: Agricultural & Biological Sub Category: Mechanization Era: 1930s DateCreated: 1937 508 W Main St New Holland State: PA Zip: 17557 Country: USA Website: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/new-holland-baler-11.aspx Creator:

This machine is the world's first successful automatic pickup, self-tying hay baler. Its invention was a significant contribution to the development of American Agriculture. The baler was invented and hand-built in 1937 at Farmersville, Pa., a few miles from here. After testing and improvement, some production models were made at Kinzers, Pa. Balers of this type were first mass-produced in 1940 by the New Holland Machine Company. Dedicated by American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1976

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Image Caption: Era_date_from:
Cierva C.8W
Society: Main Category: Sub Category: Era: DateCreated: 1155 Easton Rd Horsham State: PA Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=18153 Creator: Pitcairn, Harold F.

On December 18, 1928, Arthur Rawson, a factory pilot for the Cierva Autogiro Company, and then Harold F. Pitcairn, flew a Cierva C.8W Autogiro from Building #3 at Pitcairn Field #2. The flights marked the first time a rotary-wing aircraft was successfully flown in the U.S.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Credit: Image Caption: Cierva C.8W Era_date_from:
Mellon Institute of Industrial Research,
Society: ACS Main Category: Chemical Sub Category: Education Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1937 4400 Fifth Ave Pittsburgh State: PA Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/mellon-institute.html Creator:

Prior to its merger with the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1967 to form Carnegie Mellon University, the nonprofit Mellon Institute for Industrial Research was a major, independent research corporation dedicated to promoting applied research for industry and educating scientific researchers for the benefit of society as a whole. The Institute educated hundreds of fellows for careers in industrial research and helped to sell the very idea of research to manufacturers.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Piotrus (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: Mellon Institute, CMU Era_date_from:
Rachel Carson
Society: ACS Main Category: Chemical Sub Category: Education Era: 1960s DateCreated: 1962 Chatham University Pittsburgh State: PA Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/rachel-carson-silent-spring.html Creator: Carson, Rachel

Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, published in 1962, was a landmark in the development of the modern environmental movement. Carson’s scientific perspective and rigor created a work of substantial depth and credibility that sparked widespread debate within the scientific community and the broader public about the effect of pesticides on the natural world. These discussions led to new policies that protect our air, our water, and, ultimately, our health and safety.

YearAdded:
2012
Image Credit: Image Caption: Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement. Era_date_from:
Dehydrated_shredded_potatoes
Society: ACS Main Category: Sub Category: Era: DateCreated: Eastern Regional Research Center Wyndmoor State: PA Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/fooddehydration.html#history-of-dehydrated-potatoes Creator: Eastern Regional Research Center

Instant mashed potatoes are commonplace on grocery shelves and have found wide use institutionally and in domestic and international food aid programs. The most successful form of instant mashed potatoes resulted from the flake process developed in the 1950s and 1960s at the Eastern Regional Research Center, a United States Department of Agriculture facility outside of Philadelphia. The process for reconstituting instant mashed potatoes devised at this facility utilized dehydration technology.

YearAdded:
2007
Image Credit: Image Caption: Dehydrated shredded potatoes Era_date_from:
First Oil Well
Society: ACS Main Category: Chemical Sub Category: Industrial Advances Era: 1850-1859 DateCreated: 1859 Drake Well Museum Titusville State: PA Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/pennsylvaniaoilindustry.html Creator: Drake, Edwin

Long before Texas gushers and offshore drilling, and a century before oil wells dotted Arabian sands and rose out of Venezuelan waters, the center of petroleum production was western Pennsylvania. In the middle of the 19thcentury two developments occurred that guaranteed Pennsylvania’s dominance: The construction, in Pittsburgh, of the first still to refine crude oil into kerosene for use in lighting, and the drilling of the first oil well in Titusville, Pennsylvania.

 

YearAdded:
Image Credit: Image Caption: A retouched photograph showing Edwin L. Drake, to the right, and the Drake Well in the background, in Titusville, Pennsylvania, where the first commercial well was drilled in 1859 to find oil Era_date_from:
paints
Society: ACS Main Category: Chemical Sub Category: Era: 1940s DateCreated: 1949 Philadelphia State: PA Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/acrylicemulsion.html Creator: Rohm and Haas [now The Dow Chemical Company]

Developed by Rohm and Haas in the 1940s, water-based acrylic emulsion technology filled a need for easy-to-use household paints for a growing suburban population in the United States following World War II. This aqueous technology required less preparation to use, was easier to clean up, had less odor, and performed better than or equal to paints made with solvents. It was also a leap forward in acrylic chemistry.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/United Soybean Board (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: From plastics to paints it changed our world
Era_date_from:
Society: IEEE Main Category: Electric Sub Category: Era: 1940-1949 DateCreated: 1946 Moore School of Electrical Engineering Philadelphia State: PA Zip: 19104 Country: USA Website: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Electronic_Numerical_Integrator_and_Computer,_1946 Creator: Moore School of Electrical Engineering

A major advance in the history of computing occurred at the University of Pennsylvania in 1946 when engineers put the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) into operation. Designed and constructed at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering under a U. S. Army contract during World War II, the ENIAC established the practicality of large scale, electronic digital computers and strongly influenced the development of the modern, stored-program, general-purpose computer.

 

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/US Army Image Caption: Programmers operate the main control panel of the ENIAC. Era_date_from: 1946
Horseshoe Curve
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Rail Transportation Era: 1840-1849 DateCreated: 1847-1854 Horse Shoe Curve Park Altoona State: PA Zip: 16601 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/project/horseshoe-curve-pennsylvania-rr/ Creator: Consolidated Rail Corporation

One of the earliest and most impressive of America's great railroad engineering feats, the Horseshoe Curve was built as a means of overcoming a straight-line grade over the geological feature known as the Allegheny Escarpment or Allegheny front, which separates the ridge-and-valley section of Pennsylvania (on the east) from the Allegheny Front (on the west). Such a straight-line route would have made commercial railroad operations unfeasible from both and economic and technical standpoint.

YearAdded:
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/US Geological Survey Image Caption: The Horseshoe Curve was built as a means of overcoming a straight-line grade over the geological feature known as the Allegheny Escarpment. Era_date_from: 1847
City Plan of Philadelphia
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Structures Era: 1600s DateCreated: 1682 Philadelphia State: PA Zip: undefined Country: USA Website: https://www.asce.org/project/city-plan-of-philadelphia/ Creator:

The City Plan of Philadelphia is a seminal creation in American city planning in that it was the first American City Plan to provide open public squares for the free enjoyment of the community and a gridiron street pattern featuring streets of varying widths: wide main streets and narrower side streets. In addition this plan was the first city plan in the United States to provide for long-term urban growth. These features inspired the planners of many cities to adopt the Philadelphia Plan as a model. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Dogears Image Caption: The City Plan of Philadelphia pioneered many features of American city planning. Era_date_from: 1682
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Innovations

Russell Marker and the Mexican Steroid Hormone Industry

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