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2012

Lunken Field
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1920sDateCreated: 1925Cincinnati Municipal Lunken AirportCincinnatiState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=19528

Lunken Field, now also known as Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport, opened in 1925 on ground purchased from the Cincinnati Polo Club. The nation’s largest municipal airport at the time, it attracted several aerospace enterprises, starting with early aviator J. Richard “Dixie” Davis, who established his barnstorming enterprise there in 1925.  In 1928, several other firms established enterprises at the field – each making history.

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2012
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/redlegsfan21 (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Cincinnati Municipal Airport – Lunken Field
Pearson Field
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1900sDateCreated: 1905Pearson FieldVancouverState: WACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=13667

Pearson Field, named for U.S. Army Lt. Alexander Pearson Jr., a prominent early aviator who died in an airplane crash in 1925, is the oldest continuously operating airfield in the Pacific Northwest, and one of the oldest in the United States. In 1905, the field, then known as the Fort Vancouver Polo Grounds, was the landing site for a dirigible launched from the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exhibition in Portland, Ore. This marked the first crossing of the Columbia River by air, and the first time an airship was used to deliver a letter.

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2012
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/John Kloepper (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Pearson Field, in Vancouver Wa.
Bell Aircraft Corporation's main factory
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1935Calspan Flight Research CenterNiagara FallsState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/Secondary.aspx?id=14063Creator: Bell, Lawrence Dale “Larry”

Bell Aircraft, founded in 1935 by Lawrence Dale “Larry” Bell, based its primary manufacturing facility in Wheatfield, New York, where several important aircraft were designed and produced. During the World War II era, the plant produced the P-39 Airacobra and the P-63 Kingcobra fighters. The P-39 was used to great effect by the Soviet Air Force, with the highest number of individual kills recorded by any U.S.-produced fighter aircraft during the war. The plant also designed and manufactured the P-59A Airacomet, the first U.S.

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2012
Image Caption: Bell Aircraft Corporation's main factory in Wheatfield, NY (Buffalo / Niagara Falls) during the 1940s. This unit primarily produced the Bell P-39 Airacobra and P-63 Kingcobra.
Rachel Carson
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: EducationEra: 1960sDateCreated: 1962Chatham UniversityPittsburghState: PACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/rachel-carson-silent-spring.htmlCreator: Carson, Rachel

Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, published in 1962, was a landmark in the development of the modern environmental movement. Carson’s scientific perspective and rigor created a work of substantial depth and credibility that sparked widespread debate within the scientific community and the broader public about the effect of pesticides on the natural world. These discussions led to new policies that protect our air, our water, and, ultimately, our health and safety.

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2012
Image Caption: Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement.
Signs
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1936Day-Glo Color Corp.ClevelandState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/dayglo.htmlCreator: Switzer, Robert and Joseph

DayGlo fluorescent pigments, a new class of pigments based on fluorescent dyes and polymeric materials, were developed between the 1930s and 1950s by scientists at Switzer Brothers, Inc. (now Day-Glo Color Corp.). These pigments absorb various light frequencies (visible and invisible to the human eye) and reemit them, producing intense visible colors that appear to glow, even in daylight.

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2012
Image Caption: Signs are one common use for DayGlo fluorescent pigments.
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1960491 Dutton St #2LowellState: MAZip: 01854Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/251-19th-century-textile-tools-and-machinery

Referred to as the "catalyst of the Industrial Revolution," textile manufacturing helped to transform the American economy from an agricultural to a manufacturing economy. It led to transitions from human to mechanical power and from wood to metal construction. Population shifts resulted from significant numbers of people moving from rural areas to work in urban factories. The collection of tools and machinery housed at the American Textile History Museum (ATHM) represents a collection of ideas which developed during this period.

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2012
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Z22Image Caption: Throstle frame in Lowell, Massachusetts.
Mr. Charlie Oil Drilling Rig
Society: ASMEEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1953The Rig MuseumMorgan CityState: LAZip: 70380Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/250-mr-charlie-oil-drilling-rig, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/96eac69e-76ec-49af-aa4a-4a458f818e3c/250-Mr-Charlie-Oil-Drilling-Rig.aspxCreator: Laborde, Alden, Murphy, Charles

Designed by Alden “Doc” Laborde, Mr. Charlie is the first offshore drilling rig that was fully transportable, submersible and self-sufficient, allowing it to drill more than 200 oil and gas wells along the Gulf Coast between 1954 and 1986.

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2012
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Mr. Charlie Oil Drilling RigEra_date_from: 1953
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