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1937

Noble Blade Cultivator
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1937Nobleford Centennial ParkNoblefordZip: AB T0L 1S0Country: CanadaWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/noble-blade-cultivator-46.aspxCreator: Noble, Charles S.

In the 1930's thousands of acres of land were rendered unproductive through wind erosion because of drought, tillage, and dust mulch farming practices. Charles S. Noble, of Nobleford, Alberta, invented a cultivator that sheared stubble and weeds below the ground surface, leaving residue on the soil to reduce evaporation and prevent erosion by strong Alberta winds. The Noble Blade Cultivator was patented in 1937. The Noble family subsequently developed a variety of straight and V-blade cultivators.

YearAdded:
2013
New Holland Baler
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: MechanizationEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1937508 W Main StNew HollandState: PAZip: 17557Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/new-holland-baler-11.aspx

This machine is the world's first successful automatic pickup, self-tying hay baler. Its invention was a significant contribution to the development of American Agriculture. The baler was invented and hand-built in 1937 at Farmersville, Pa., a few miles from here. After testing and improvement, some production models were made at Kinzers, Pa. Balers of this type were first mass-produced in 1940 by the New Holland Machine Company. Dedicated by American Society of Agricultural Engineers 1976

YearAdded:
1976
Mellon Institute of Industrial Research,
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: EducationEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 19374400 Fifth AvePittsburghState: PACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/mellon-institute.html

Prior to its merger with the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1967 to form Carnegie Mellon University, the nonprofit Mellon Institute for Industrial Research was a major, independent research corporation dedicated to promoting applied research for industry and educating scientific researchers for the benefit of society as a whole. The Institute educated hundreds of fellows for careers in industrial research and helped to sell the very idea of research to manufacturers.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Piotrus (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Mellon Institute, CMU
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 19371-99 San Francisco – Bay BridgeOaklandState: CAZip: 94607Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/People-and-Projects/Projects/Landmarks/San-Francisco---Oakland-Bay-Bridge/Creator: Purcell, Charles , American Bridge Company
Ever since the Gold Rush days of the 1850s, San Francisco Bay area residents and businesses had lobbied for a bridge joining San Francisco and Oakland. Early studies indicated that the bridge was impractical and infeasible; but in October 1929, President Herbert Hoover (himself an engineer) and California Governor C. C. Young appointed the Hoover-Young San Francisco Bay Bridge Commission to study the question more closely.
YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/David Baron (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: San Francisco - Oakland Bay BridgeEra_date_from: 1937
Golden Gate Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1937Golden Gate National Recreation AreaMill ValleyState: CAZip: 94941Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Golden-Gate-Bridge/Creator: Ellis, Charles , Strauss, Joseph

Put in service in 1937, this world-renowned bridge, conceived by Joseph Strauss and designed largely by Charles Ellis, was the longest single span (4,200 feet) in the world for a quarter century.

As with many civil engineering projects in their conceptual stages, naysayers scoffed at the Golden Gate Bridge. They said it would be technically unfeasible or too expensive to bridge the Golden Gate, a 1.7-mile-wide opening separating the Pacific Ocean from the San Francisco Bay. They said that the channel was too deep; the tides and winds too strong; the span too long.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Salim Virji (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Golden Gate BridgeEra_date_from: 1937
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