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Noble Blade Cultivator
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1937Nobleford Centennial ParkNoblefordZip: AB T0L 1S0Country: CanadaWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/noble-blade-cultivator-46.aspxCreator: Noble, Charles S.

In the 1930's thousands of acres of land were rendered unproductive through wind erosion because of drought, tillage, and dust mulch farming practices. Charles S. Noble, of Nobleford, Alberta, invented a cultivator that sheared stubble and weeds below the ground surface, leaving residue on the soil to reduce evaporation and prevent erosion by strong Alberta winds. The Noble Blade Cultivator was patented in 1937. The Noble family subsequently developed a variety of straight and V-blade cultivators.

YearAdded:
2013
silver dart airborn
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: VehiclesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909Alexander Graham Bell National Historic SiteBaddeckCountry: CanadaWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About-AIAA/Governance/GovernanceDocs/AnnualReports/AIAA_AnnualReport_2009-2010.pdfCreator: Bell, Alexander Graham

AIAA designated Baddeck, Nova Scotia as a historic site, providing a plaque to commemorate the centennial of the first powered flight in Canada. On February 23, 1909, piloting the “Silver Dart,” J.A. Douglas McCurdy took off from the frozen surface of Bras d’Or Lake at Baddeck Bay, and flew for close to one kilometer before landing safely on ice. The plane had been created by Mabel and Alexander Graham Bell’s Aerial Experiment Association, formed in 1907 to build and fly experimental aircraft.

Image Caption: The AEA Silver Dart, researched and built by the Aerial Experiment Association (AEA) under Alexander Graham Bell's tutelage in 1908.
First Television Broadcast in Western Canada
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1953CBC Broadcasting Site, Mount SeymourNorth VancouverState: BCZip: V7G 1L3Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Television_Broadcast_in_Western_CanadaCreator: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

On 16 December 1953, the first television broadcast in Western Canada was transmitted from this site by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's CBUT Channel 2. The engineering experience gained here was instrumental in the subsequent establishment of the more than one thousand public and private television broadcasting sites that serve Western Canada today.

YearAdded:
2010
Era_date_from: 1953
First Radio Astronomical Observations Using Very Long Baseline Interferometry
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1967Dominion Radio Astrophysical ObservatoryCaledenState: BCZip: V0H 1K0Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Radio_Astronomical_Observations_Using_Very_Long_Baseline_Interferometry

On the morning of 17 April 1967, radio astronomers used this radiotelescope at DRAO and a second one at the Algonquin Radio Observatory located 3074 km away to make the first successful radio astronomical observations using Very Long Baseline Interferometry. Today, VLBI networks span the globe, extend into space and continue to make significant contributions to both radio astronomy and geodesy.

YearAdded:
2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bulliver (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radiotelescope at DRAOEra_date_from: 1967
Bell
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1876ParisState: OntarioZip: N3L 2M3Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Distant_Speech_Transmission_in_Canada,_1876Creator: Bell, Alexander Graham

On 10 August 1876, Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated on this site that the human voice could be transmitted electrically over distance. While family members spoke into a transmitter in Brantford, 13 km away, Bell was able to hear them at a receiver located in Paris. This test convinced Bell that his invention could be used for communication between towns and could compete successfully with the telegraph.  

 

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: Alexander Graham BellEra_date_from: 1876
First 500 MeV Proton Beam from the TRIUMF Cyclotron
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1974TRIUMF Meson FacilityVancouverState: BCZip: V6T 2A3Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_500_MeV_Proton_Beam_from_the_TRIUMF_Cyclotron,_1974

At 3:30 pm on 15 December 1974, the first 500 MeV proton beam was extracted from the TRIUMF cyclotron. Since then, TRIUMF has used proton beams from its cyclotron (and secondary beams of pions, muons, neutrons and radioactive ions produced in its experimental halls) to conduct pioneering studies that have advanced nuclear physics, particle physics, molecular and materials science, and nuclear medicine.

YearAdded:
2010
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: Staff with the Lower Magnet Assembly of the TRIUMF.Era_date_from: 1974
First 735 kV AC Transmission System
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1965Hydro-QuebecMontréalState: QuebecCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_735_kV_AC_Transmission_System,_1965Creator: Hydro-Quebec

Hydro-Quebec's 735,000 volt electric power transmission system was the first in the world to be designed, built and operated at an alternating-current voltage above 700 kV. This development extended the limits of long-distance transmission of electrical energy. On 29 November 1965 the first 735 kV line was inaugurated. Power was transmitted from the Manicouagan-Outardes hydro-electric generating complex to Montreal, a distance of 600 km.

YearAdded:
2005
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/abdallahh (cc-by-2.0)Image Caption: A pylon of the 735kV power transmission system.Era_date_from: 1965
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricDateCreated: 1972Eel River Dalhousie Generating StationNorth ShannonvaleCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Eel_River_High_Voltage_Direct_Current_Converter_StationCreator: Canadian General Electric, NB Power

Operating since 1972, Eel River, New Brunswick is home to the world's first commercial solid state High Voltage Direct Current converter station. This 320 MW interconnection facility, built by Canadian General Electric and NB Power, incorporates high current silicon solid state thyristors to convert alternating current from Hydro Quebec to direct current and back to alternating, allowing asynchronous, stable power transfers to serve New Brunswick's Power's customers.

YearAdded:
2011
Era_date_from: 1972
White Pass & Yukon Railroad
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1900WhitehorseState: YukonCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/white-pass-and-yukon-railroad/Creator: Brackett, George

Combining British financing, American engineering, and Canadian contracting, the White Pass and Yukon was the first major civil engineering project on the continent above the 60th degree of northern latitude. Completed in 27 months using only hand tools, black powder, and regional timber, the White Pass and Yukon rises almost 2,900 feet from sea level at the port of Skagway to the White Pass summit on the U.S.-Canada border in just 20 miles, accomplishing one of the steepest climbs of any railroad in the world.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Klanda (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: White Pass & Yukon RailroadEra_date_from: 1900
St. Clair Tunnel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: TunnelsEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1891Beneath the St. Clair RiverSarniaState: ONZip: N7T 8G8Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/St--Clair-Tunnel/Creator: Hobson, Joseph , Beach, Alfred

A Day's Pay According to tunnel records, the following pay rates were established for the 600-700 laborers required for this project: 

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Public DomainImage Caption: Postcard of the west end St. Clair River Tunnel in Port Huron, Michigan, United States.Era_date_from: 1891
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