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Gold Rush

White Pass & Yukon Railroad
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1900WhitehorseState: YukonCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/white-pass-and-yukon-railroad/Creator: Brackett, George

Combining British financing, American engineering, and Canadian contracting, the White Pass and Yukon was the first major civil engineering project on the continent above the 60th degree of northern latitude. Completed in 27 months using only hand tools, black powder, and regional timber, the White Pass and Yukon rises almost 2,900 feet from sea level at the port of Skagway to the White Pass summit on the U.S.-Canada border in just 20 miles, accomplishing one of the steepest climbs of any railroad in the world.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Klanda (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: White Pass & Yukon RailroadEra_date_from: 1900
Manufacturer’s identification plaque
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Reed Gold Mine Historic SiteMidlandState: NCZip: 28107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-84-reed-gold-mine-ten-stamp-mill-%281895%29Creator: Mecklenburg Iron Works

The first authenticated discovery of gold in the U.S. occurred on the Cabarrus County farm of John Reed in 1799, sparking the nation's first gold rush. During its peak years, more than a million dollars of gold was recovered a year, making North Carolina a leader in gold production until 1848. This mill, built by the Mecklenburg Iron Works of Charlotte, North Carolina, is original except for the timber work. Two groups of five 750-pound stamps with 5- to 7-inch lift, rose and fell thirty-five times a minute to yield a finely crushed ore.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Caption: Manufacturer’s identification plaqueEra_date_from: 1895
Bridgeport Covered Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, TransportationEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1862Yuba RiverPenn ValleyState: CAZip: 95946Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Bridgeport-Covered-Bridge/Creator: Virginia City Turnpike Company, Burr, Theodore

A product of the Northern California Gold Rush, the Bridgeport Covered Bridge is believed to be the longest, single-span, wooden covered bridge in the United States. Crossing the south fork of the Yuba River at a span of 233 feet, the bridge was built by the Virginia City Turnpike Company as part of a 14-mile toll road authorized by the California state legislature. The toll road was an essential link connecting Virginia City, Nevada, and the silver-producing Comstock Lode with the centers of California commerce.

YearAdded:
1970
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Rick Cooper (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Bridgeport Covered Bridge, one of the longest covered bridges in the nationEra_date_from: 1862
Belle Fourche Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Dams, Water Supply & ControlEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911confluence of the Redwater and Belle Fourche RiversBelle FourcheState: SDZip: 57754Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Belle-Fourche-Dam/Creator: Orman & Crook

Belle Fourche, meaning "Beautiful Forks" in French, refers to the confluence of the Redwater and Belle Fourche Rivers. The gold rush to the Black Hills in 1876 brought many people to the area, but agriculture and livestock soon became the principal industries. Farmers and civic leaders recognized the need for a reliable source of irrigation water in this semi-arid region and petitioned the Federal government for funds to build an irrigation and flood control system.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Bureau of Reclamation)Image Caption: An aerial view of the Belle Fourche DamEra_date_from: 1911
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