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1988

Slotted Inlet Ventilation
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: StorageEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1948Cornell UniversityColumbusState: OHZip: 43210Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/slotted-inlet-ventilation-37.aspxCreator: Millier, William F.

A Crucial Step In The Evolution Of Modern Animal Agriculture Was The Development Of Mechanical Ventilation Methods For Animal Housing. Air Inlets Are Pivotal To Good Ventilation. In 1948 William F. Millier, Working At Cornell University Under The Direction Of Professor Clesson Turner, Tested And Published The Concept Of The Slotted Inlet. Professor Turner And Others At Cornell University Subsequently Continued To Develop Slotted Inlet Systems And Systematize Design Methods.

YearAdded:
1988
Pickup Forage Harvester
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930-1949DateCreated: 1931Agricultural Engineering Laboratory, University of WisconsinMadisonState: WIZip: 53911Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/forage-harvester-22.aspxCreator: Saiberlich, Erwin W.

William J. Conroy Of Aylmer, Quebec, Received Patent No. 465,127 On The First Field Hay Chopper On 15 December, 1891. Its Sickle Cut The Crop, Which Was Elevated Directly Into A Cylindrical Curved-Bar Cutterhead. It Was Not Commercially Successful, But It Recognized The Need.

Professor Floyd Waldo Duffee, Agricultural Engineering Department, University Of Wisconsin, Built And Field Tested A Silo Filler With An Attached Hay Loader In 1926. He Presented The Specifications Of A Complete Unified Harvester To The National Asabe Meeting In 1927.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bob Adams (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Claas Jaguar 870 forage harvester with pickup header
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1838Historic Speedwell ParkMorristownState: NJZip: 07960Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Demonstration_of_Practical_Telegraphy,_1838Creator: Morse, Samuel F. B., Vail, Alfred
In January 1838, Samuel F. B. Morse and Alfred Vail first demonstrated publicly crucial elements of their telegraph system, using instruments that Vail had constructed during the previous months. Electrical pulses, transmitted through two miles of wire, caused an electromagnet to ink dots and dashes (grouped to represent letters and words) on a strip of paper. Commercialization began in 1844 when funding became available. A ministerial student, a professor of fine arts, and a prominent industrialist...
YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: The original Samuel Morse telegraphEra_date_from: 1838
River des Peres Sewage & Drainage Works
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1924-1921St. LouisState: MOZip: 63109Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/River-des-Peres-Sewage---Drainage-Works/Creator: Horner, W.W.

In 1915, a tropical storm dropped nearly 11 inches of rain on St. Louis in just 17 hours, causing a devastating flood. Claiming 11 lives and the homes of 1,025 families, the flood focused public and government attention onto the problems of the river. 

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/MillbrookyImage Caption: Today, the River Des Peres Sewage & Drainage Works provides the backbone for the 110-square-mile St. Louis drainage basin.Era_date_from: 1924
Sydney Harbour Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1932Port JacksonMilsons PointState: NSWZip: 206Country: AustraliaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Sydney-Harbour-Bridge/Creator: Bradfield, John , Freeman, Ralph

The design of the Sydney Harbour Bridge closely resembles the Hell Gate Bridge over the East River in New York City, conceived in 1916 by noted engineer Gustav Lindenthal and his chief assistant, O.H. Ammann.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Kevin Gibbons (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Sydney Harbour BridgeEra_date_from: 1932
Ames Hydroelectric Generating Plant
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1891Uncompahgre National ForestOphirState: COZip: 81435Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Ames_Hydroelectric_Generating_Plant,_1891

"Electricity produced here in the spring of 1891 was transmitted 2.6 miles over rugged and at times inaccessible terrain to provide power for operating the motor-driven mill at the Gold King Mine. This pioneering demonstration of the practical value of transmitting electrical power was a significant precedent in the United States for much larger plants at Niagara Falls (in 1895) and elsewhere. Electricity at Ames was generated at 3000 volts, 133 Hertz, single-phase AC, by a 100-hp Westinghouse alternator."

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Ray Wood (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: The Ames Hydroelectric Generating Plant, and behind it the trees of the Uncompahgre National ForestEra_date_from: 1891
Pennsylvania Turnpike (Old Section)
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & Rails, TransportationEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1940Abandoned Pennsylvania Turnpike
Breezewood
HarrisburgState: PACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/pennsylvania-tunpike-(old-section)/Creator: Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission

The Pennsylvania Turnpike was the first American paved highway of the automobile era in which tolls alone were expected to pay all project costs. The 160-mile roadway, which cut an east-west path from Pittsburgh to the state capital of Harrisburg, was considered a revolutionary example of transportation system design and served as a model for the Interstate Highway System.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Pennsylvania Turnpike (Old Section)Era_date_from: 1940
Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Cheussees
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: EducationEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1747Marne-la-ValléeParisState: Ile-de-FranceCountry: FranceWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/ecole-nationale-des-ponts-et-chaussees/Creator: Trudaine, Daniel-Charles

Inventions credited to the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees and its graduates include: prestressed concrete, lighting gas, and the optical lens. The school and its graduates also have been central to research in the diffraction of light, the applications of concrete, and the measurement of the strength of materials.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/MagnusTheGreat (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Ecole Nationale des Ponts et CheusseesEra_date_from: 1747
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1850s205 N Broadway StreetAuroraState: ILZip: 60505Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-132-chicago-burlington---quincy-railroad-roundhouCreator: Waterhouse, Levi Hull

The Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy Railroad was the first railroad to link Chicago and the Mississippi River, in the 1850s. This forty-stall roundhouse, large even for its time, became a major center for railroad activity for the CB&Q. It served as a repair and construction facility from which more locomotives and cars than any other CB&Q installation were built. Steam engines, passenger cars, freight cars, precision parts, tools, and machines were designed and built, beginning about 1858.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/EarlRShumaker (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Chicago Burlington & Quincy Railroad RoundhouseEra_date_from: 1850s
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Materials Handling & ExcavationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1902Hancock Historical MuseumFindlayState: OHZip: 45840Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/materials-handling-and-excavation/-133-buckeye-steam-traction-ditcher-%281902%29Creator: Hill, James

During the post-Civil War era, efforts to cultivate the land for higher crop yields resulted in the digging of thousands of miles of ditches to improve land drainage. Accurately graded ditches were needed for open drainage, pipeline trenches and placement of underground agricultural drainage tile. Teams of skilled workers laid out the direction and gradient of a ditch and dug it out with pick and shovel. The Black Swamp area, where Lake Erie drains into northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan, was the center of much of the U.S. ditching activity.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Caption: Buckeye Steam Traction DitcherEra_date_from: 1902
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