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Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1890sYork Water CompanyYorkState: PAZip: 17401Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/77-worthington-horizontal-cross-compound-pumping, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/8943cdf5-6cab-4567-b165-42f489334684/77-Worthington-Horizontal-Cross-compound-Pumping.aspxCreator: Corliss, George H.

Smaller and cheaper than a triple-expansion vertical engine, the horizontal cross-compound pumping engine, Pump No. 2, ran at relatively slow revolutions and was considered the height of engineering from the 1890s to World War I. This pumping engine at the York Water Company was built by the Worthington Pump & Machinery Corporation, Snow-Holly Works, Buffalo, New York.

YearAdded:
1982
Era_date_from: 1890s
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Materials Handling & ExcavationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1902Hancock Historical MuseumFindlayState: OHZip: 45840Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/materials-handling-and-excavation/-133-buckeye-steam-traction-ditcher-%281902%29Creator: Hill, James

During the post-Civil War era, efforts to cultivate the land for higher crop yields resulted in the digging of thousands of miles of ditches to improve land drainage. Accurately graded ditches were needed for open drainage, pipeline trenches and placement of underground agricultural drainage tile. Teams of skilled workers laid out the direction and gradient of a ditch and dug it out with pick and shovel. The Black Swamp area, where Lake Erie drains into northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan, was the center of much of the U.S. ditching activity.

YearAdded:
1988
Image Caption: Buckeye Steam Traction DitcherEra_date_from: 1902
Charleston - Hamburg Railroad
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 1833CharlestonState: SCCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asce.org/project/charleston-hamburg-railroad/Creator: Allen, Horatio

Built with a single set of tracks consisting of hardwood rails and wooden ties, and using wooden trestles to carry it over low-lying areas, the 136-mile Charleston-Hamburg Railroad was one of the longest railroads in the world when it was completed in 1833. It also became the first railroad in the United States to be powered entirely by steam, the first to carry mail under contract, and the first to provide regularly scheduled passenger service.

YearAdded:
1969
Image Credit: The earliest general map to show the South Carolina Canal and Rail Road Company's line which began in Charleston, S.C. It was completed to Hamburg, S.C., in 1833. Its 136 miles of track were then the longest in the world. Image Caption: Charleston - Hamburg Railroad, also known as Era_date_from: 1833
Bergen County Steam Collection
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1900sBergen County Technical SchoolsParamusState: NJZip: 07652Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/About-ASME/History/Landmarks/Topics-A-L/Electric-Power-Production-Steam/-175-Bergen-County-Steam-Collection, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5502.pdfCreator: Bergen Tech Students, Vopasek, Frank

This collection of equipment—all of it maintained in operating condition and used for educational purposes—was established in 1987. It spans the period from the late 19th century to the 1940s, when steam was the prime motive force for most U.S. industries, including rail and marine transportation. The collection of about 25 items (mostly stationary steam) includes a locomotive, switcher, and steam tractor: Locomotive #385 Consolidation 2-8-0 designed for fast freight service was built by Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia in November 1907 for the Southern Railway.

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Locomotive #385 built by the Baldwin Locomotive
Works of Philadelphia, PA in 1907 for the
Southern Railway. Now part of the Bergen County Steam Collection
Era_date_from: 1900s
Norfolk & Western #611, Class J Steam Locomotive
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1941Virginia Museum of TransportationRoanokeState: VAZip: 24016Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---1/-94-norfolk---western--611,-class-j-steam-locomoti, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5609.pdfCreator: Norfolk & Western

Developed for use in both the plains and mountains, this coal-fired passenger locomotive was among the most advanced in design, construction, and performance of any 4-8-4. Designed by Norfolk & Western engineers and built in the Norfolk & Western Roanoke shops, the 611 was specially balanced to minimize rail damage at high speeds. No. 611, eleventh of fourteen constructed and the last survivor, was retired from service and donated to the Roanoke Transportation Museum in 1959.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Norfolk & Western #611, Class J Steam LocomotiveEra_date_from: 1941
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