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1930-1939

Rain Bird Impact Drive Sprinkler Head
Society: ASABE Main Category: Agricultural & Biological Sub Category: Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1933 Rain Bird corporate office Azusa State: CA Zip: 91702 Country: USA Website: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/rain-bird-sprinkler-head-24.aspx Creator: Englehardt, Orton

The Rain Bird horizontal action impact drive sprinkler head was invented in 1933 by Orton Englehardt, a citrus grower and native of Glendora. The design offered slow rotation and uniform watering, benefits long sought by local irrigators. Clement M. LaFetra, a friend of Englehardt, urged early patent application. A patent was awarded on December 18, 1933. Englehardt, with no entrepreneurial aspirations, assigned all rights to LaFetra and his wife Mary Elizabeth. Production began in the LaFetra family barn on October 13, 1935.

YearAdded:
1990
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Noble Blade Cultivator
Society: ASABE Main Category: Agricultural & Biological Sub Category: Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1937 Nobleford Centennial Park Nobleford State: Zip: AB T0L 1S0 Country: Canada Website: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/noble-blade-cultivator-46.aspx Creator: Noble, Charles S.

In the 1930's thousands of acres of land were rendered unproductive through wind erosion because of drought, tillage, and dust mulch farming practices. Charles S. Noble, of Nobleford, Alberta, invented a cultivator that sheared stubble and weeds below the ground surface, leaving residue on the soil to reduce evaporation and prevent erosion by strong Alberta winds. The Noble Blade Cultivator was patented in 1937. The Noble family subsequently developed a variety of straight and V-blade cultivators.

YearAdded:
2013
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Anhydrous Ammonia Application Technology
Society: ASABE Main Category: Agricultural & Biological Sub Category: Chemical Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1932 Delta Research and Extension Center Stoneville State: MS Zip: 38776 Country: USA Website: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/anhydrous-ammonia-application-technology-56.aspx Creator: Edwards, Felix, Smith, J. O., Andrews, W. B.

In 1932, J. O. Smith, Agricultural Engineer at Delta Branch Experiment Station in Stoneville, MS, attached a small anhydrous ammonia cylinder to a plow in such a manner that the NH3 was released in the soil.  The plow, a Georgia Stock, was pulled by a gray mule named Ike.  This was the first known use of anhydrous ammonia as a soil-applied crop fertilizer.  The crude apparatus and the anhydrous ammonia it applied provided a much needed source of nitrogen for the otherwise rich alluvial soils of the Mississippi Delta. 

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/thirteenofclubs (CC BY-SA 2.0) Image Caption: Anhydrous Ammonia is one of the cheapest forms of nitrogen fertilizer available on the market. However because it is such a hazardous material and is difficult to apply, many farmers choose to hire third party businesses to store and apply the fertilizer. Era_date_from:
Mellon Institute of Industrial Research,
Society: ACS Main Category: Chemical Sub Category: Education Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1937 4400 Fifth Ave Pittsburgh State: PA Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/mellon-institute.html Creator:

Prior to its merger with the Carnegie Institute of Technology in 1967 to form Carnegie Mellon University, the nonprofit Mellon Institute for Industrial Research was a major, independent research corporation dedicated to promoting applied research for industry and educating scientific researchers for the benefit of society as a whole. The Institute educated hundreds of fellows for careers in industrial research and helped to sell the very idea of research to manufacturers.

YearAdded:
2013
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Piotrus (CC BY-SA 3.0) Image Caption: Mellon Institute, CMU Era_date_from:
Society: Main Category: Sub Category: Era: DateCreated: State: Zip: Country: Website: Creator:

At 5:04:40 on Saturday morning, May 26, 1934, the first diesel-powered, stainless-steel, streamlined train pulled out of Union Station, Denver, on a dawn-to-dusk race for Chicago. Called the Zephyr, it had been delivered to the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in Philadelphia just six weeks earlier and had traveled west in a series of short trips. To reach Chicago before sunset, it had to cover 1,015 miles nonstop in less than fourteen hours.

YearAdded:
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Society: IEEE Main Category: Electric Sub Category: Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1930-1945 Tokyo Institute of Technology Nikaho State: Zip: Country: Japan Website: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Development_of_Ferrite_Materials_and_Their_Applications,_1930-1945 Creator: Takei, Takeshi
Dr. Takeshi Takei, the professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, discovered that composite oxides containing zinc and iron have distinguished magnetic properties. In 1930, Prof. Takei submitted a paper on his work to Japanese Electro-chemical Society and also presented a paper at 57th General Meeting of American Electrochemical Society in St. Louis. That same year, Prof. Takei applied a patent for his discovery, which was granted in 1932(Japan PAT-98844). Tokyo Denki Kagaku Kogyo (now TDK Corporation) was founded in 1935 to commercialize this newly invented ferrite cores.
YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Tokyo Institute of Technology Image Caption: A replica of the early soft-ferrite core. Era_date_from: 1930
Hydromatic Propeller
Society: ASME Main Category: Aerospace & Aviation Sub Category: Aerospace Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1938 New England Air Museum
Bradley Intl. Airport
Windsor Locks State: CT Zip: 06096 Country: USA Website: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-149-hydromatic-propeller-%28ca--1938%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5572.pdf Creator: Hamilton Standard

Rapid development of aircraft design in the 1930s required many related innovations, including propeller design. The hydromatic propeller by Hamilton Standard marked a significant advance over the counterweight-type, controllable pitch propeller. The first test flight of the prototype took place in 1938: the public demonstration was made by a United Air Lines DC-3 over New York City on April 6, 1938. It played a distinguished role in allied combat aircraft in World War II.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy ASME Image Caption: An early example of propeller innovations, including variable-pitch control and feathering capability. Era_date_from: 1938
Link C-3 Flight Trainer
Society: ASME Main Category: Aerospace & Aviation Sub Category: Aviation Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1935 Roberson Museum and Science Center

Binghamton State: NY Zip: 13905 Country: USA Website: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/210-link-c-3-flight-trainer Creator: Link, Edwin

During the 1920s, Edwin A. Link was employed in his father's organ building and repair business. He obtained his pilot's license in 1927 and became convinced that a mechanical device could be built as an inexpensive method to teach basic piloting. Link received three patents on his flight trainer (No. 1,825,462, March 12, 1930; No. 2,244,464, June 3, 1941; and No. 2,358,016, Sept. 12, 1944).

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Tony Speer Image Caption: An early flight simulator representative of the first truly effective mechanical device used to simulate actual flight processes. Era_date_from: 1935
White River Concrete Arch Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1930 White River Cotter State: AR Zip: 72626 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/White-River-Concrete-Arch-Bridge/ Creator: Marsh, James Barney

When this 1,850-foot concrete-arch highway bridge was built on the White River in a remote region of northern Arkansas - prior to the construction of upriver, flood-control dams - flash floods occurred frequently, sometimes causing the water to rise as much as one foot per hour. Construction under these conditions presented a clear danger, so project managers specified both a design and an innovative construction method appropriate to the problem of building across a perilous stretch of unpredictable river.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/jaystout (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: White River Concrete Arch Bridge Era_date_from: 1930
Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Bridges Era: 1930-1939 DateCreated: 1931 Penobscot River Stockton Springs State: ME Zip: E 04981 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Waldo-Hancock-Suspension-Bridge/ Creator: Steinman, David

Designed by David B. Steinman, of Robinson & Steinman, New York City, the Waldo-Hancock suspension Bridge is a significant example of Steinman's work. David Steinman is considered among the most important suspension bridge designers of the 20th century. He earned an engineering degree from Columbia University in 1909 and went on to apprentice with Gustav Lindenthal, then at work on New York's Hell Gate Bridge. In the 1920's, Steinman emerged as an outstanding and innovative suspension bridge designer.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Justin Russell (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge Era_date_from: 1931
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Innovations

First practical US helicopter, pioneering the single-main-rotor concept

America's first practical helicopter, it pioneered the single main rotor concept that became the predominant helicopter configuration throughout the world. The principles that were developed and demonstrated by the VS-300 had direct application in the design of the early mass-production…

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George Washington Bridge

"An essential part of the human experience is to create an aesthetic atmosphere."

The George Washington Bridge represented a departure in suspension bridge design. Chief Engineer O.H. Ammann developed a system of stiffening trusses that offered greater flexibility and saved the project…

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Bonneville Dam, Columbia River System

The Bonneville Dam, Columbia River Power and Navigation System consists of 55 major projects on Oregon's Columbia River and is said to be the largest hydroelectric system in the world.

The Columbia River forms part of the border between Washington and Oregon and flows inland through the…

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Bayonne Bridge

The longest steel-arch bridge in the world for 46 years, the Bayonne Bridge continues to be celebrated today as a major aesthetic and technical achievement. The 1,675-foot bridge replaced a ferry service which until then was the only means of crossing from  the Bayonne peninsula to Staten Island…

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The ballpoint pen invented by Ladislao Jose Biro was originally patented in Hungary in 1938. The principle of the ballpoint pen was originally patented by John Loud in 1888 for a product to mark leather and in 1916 by Van Vechten Riesberg, but neither of these products were exploited commercially… Read More
Colorado River Aqueduct

Stretching 242 miles from the Colorado River on the California-Arizona border to its final holding reservoir near Riverside, California, the Colorado River Aqueduct consists of more than 90 miles of tunnels, nearly 55 miles of cut-and-cover conduit, almost 30 miles of siphons, and five…

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Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge

The total length of the Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge is 7,374 feet. Its construction required 100,000 cubic yards of concrete and 8 million pounds of steel reinforcing rods.

Consisting of 28 arches, each 185 feet long, the Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge carrying automobile traffic…

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Atanasoff-Berry Computer

John Vincent Atanasoff conceived basic design principles for the first electronic-digital computer in the winter of 1937 and, assisted by his graduate student, Clifford E. Berry, constructed a prototype here in October 1939. It used binary numbers, direct logic for calculation, and a…

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The David Taylor Model Basin is among the largest facilities of its kind in the world, containing a shallow water basin, a deep water basin and a high-speed basin. Using its sophisticated combination of towing carriages, wave makers, and measuring equipment, engineers are able to determine the sea-… Read More
Detroit-Windsor Tunnel

The Detroit-Windsor Tunnel is a 5,160-foot structure that carries traffic under the Detroit River between Detroit, Michigan and Ontario, Canada. Privately financed, built, and owned, it was completed in 26 months, 10 months ahead of schedule. 

The project's engineer, the firm of…

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Dunlap's Creek Bridge

Not only was Dunlap's Creek Bridge the first cast-iron bridge in America, it was the first metal bridge anywhere to use what its builder, Capt. Richard Delafield, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, described as "standardized, interchangeable, manufactured parts." The bridge was built as part of…

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Eglin Air Force Base

Established in 1935 as the Valparaiso Bombing and Gunnery Base, the base supported the U.S. Army Air Corps, the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force, as its primary facility for training new pilots in bombing and gunnery tactics. It also served as a test facility for aircraft, aircraft armament,…

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This fusion-welded drum, tested during 1930, was the first in a series tested at Combustion Engineering Inc. that led to the industrial acceptance of welding for the fabrication of boiler drums. Replacing riveting for steam power plants, electric arc fusion welding permitted increased efficiencies… Read More
Going-to-the-Sun Road

Considered one of the world's most scenic mountain drives, the two-lane Going-To-The-Sun Road through Glacier National Park was the first major road to be constructed directly over high mountain terrain, proving that roads did not need to be limited to mountain passes.

Glacier National…

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Golden Gate Bridge

Put in service in 1937, this world-renowned bridge, conceived by Joseph Strauss and designed largely by Charles Ellis, was the longest single span (4,200 feet) in the world for a quarter century.

As with many civil engineering projects in their conceptual stages, naysayers scoffed at the…

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Hoover Dam

In 1918, the U.S. Reclamation Service's director and chief engineer Arthur P. Davis proposed a dam of unprecedented height to control the devastating floods on the Colorado River, generate hydroelectric power, and store the river's ample waters for irrigation and other uses. A dam project of…

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Kavanagh Building

Built during the 1930s, when Argentina's economy was the tenth strongest in the world, the Kavanagh Building was one of the world's first reinforced concrete skyscrapers and for many years remained the tallest building in South America. Commissioned by Corina Kavanagh and designed by architect…

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Rogue River Bridge

The Rogue River Bridge was the most advanced concrete bridge in America when it was built. Distinguished bridge engineer Conde McCullough employed the techniques of Frenchman Eugene Freyssinet to create thin, graceful concrete arches for this seven-span structure.

Pre-compression of the…

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Established in 1939 by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), and named after NACA’s first chairman, Joseph S. Ames, the center has been at the forefront of American, and worldwide, aeronautics research. From its earliest days, the center has made noteworthy contributions to the…

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Norris Dam

Norris Dam impounds the Clinch River, a mountain tributary of the Tennessee River. The facility stands as a tribute and symbol of the birth of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Given broad jurisdiction over resource development in the watershed (a 40,000-square-mile basin comprising parts of…

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