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Lindenthal

Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1931Penobscot RiverStockton SpringsState: MEZip: E 04981Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Waldo-Hancock-Suspension-Bridge/Creator: Steinman, David

Designed by David B. Steinman, of Robinson & Steinman, New York City, the Waldo-Hancock suspension Bridge is a significant example of Steinman's work. David Steinman is considered among the most important suspension bridge designers of the 20th century. He earned an engineering degree from Columbia University in 1909 and went on to apprentice with Gustav Lindenthal, then at work on New York's Hell Gate Bridge. In the 1920's, Steinman emerged as an outstanding and innovative suspension bridge designer.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Justin Russell (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Waldo-Hancock Suspension BridgeEra_date_from: 1931
Smithfield Street Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1883Monongahela RiverPittsburghState: PAZip: 15222Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Smithfield-Street-Bridge/Creator: Lindenthal, Gustav

Three rivers - the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio - join in Pittsburgh, making the city a natural site for the building of bridges. But the Smithfield Street Bridge stands apart from other Pittsburgh bridges for several reasons: it replaced structures by two well-known bridge engineers, Lewis Wernwag and John A. Roebling; it was the first use in America of the lenticular - or lens-shaped - truss design; and it was one of the first major bridges in the U.S. built primarily with steel.

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/RJ Schmidt (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Smithfield Street BridgeEra_date_from: 1883
Queensboro Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909Queensboro Bridge PathLong Island CityState: NYZip: 11101Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Queensboro-Bridge/Creator: Lindenthal, Gustav , Hornbostel, Henry

When opened in 1909, the Queensboro Bridge had the two longest steel cantilever spans in the world - 1,182 feet from Manhattan to Blackwell's Island and 984 feet from Blackwell's Island to Queens. These would remain the world's longest cantilever spans until the completion of the Quebec Bridge in 1917. The Queensboro Bridge has an overall length of 3,724.5 feet. It originally carried two elevated railway lines, two trolley lines, six carriage lanes and two pedestrian walkways. 

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/reivax (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Queensboro BridgeEra_date_from: 1909
Manhattan Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909Manhattan BridgeBrooklynState: NYZip: 11201Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/manhattan-bridge/Creator: Nichols, Othniel Foster , Moisseiff, Leon

When opened in 1909, the 1,470 foot long main span of the Manhattan Bridge was the third longest suspension bridge span in the world, after the nearby Brooklyn and Williamsburg Bridges. The Manhattan Bridge has two 725 foot long suspended side spans for an overall length of 2,920 feet. The bridge deck is supported by 4 main cables of 20.75 inch diameter, each composed of more than 35,000 individual wires. The bridge deck is stiffened by four parallel trusses of 24 foot depth, hinged at the towers.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Dave Herholz (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Manhattan BridgeEra_date_from: 1909
High Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1877Kentucky RiverWilmoreState: KYZip: 40390Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/High-Bridge/Creator: Lindenthal, Gustav

In the 1850s, the Lexington and Danville Railroad began building a suspension bridge over the Kentucky River. The bridge was designed by John A Roebling. Due to unforeseen increases in train loads, the Roebling bridge was never completed. The High Bridge would then be built 20 years later on the existing foundations.

YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: High BridgeEra_date_from: 1877
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