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Waldo-Hancock Suspension Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1931Penobscot RiverStockton SpringsState: MEZip: E 04981Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Waldo-Hancock-Suspension-Bridge/Creator: Steinman, David

Designed by David B. Steinman, of Robinson & Steinman, New York City, the Waldo-Hancock suspension Bridge is a significant example of Steinman's work. David Steinman is considered among the most important suspension bridge designers of the 20th century. He earned an engineering degree from Columbia University in 1909 and went on to apprentice with Gustav Lindenthal, then at work on New York's Hell Gate Bridge. In the 1920's, Steinman emerged as an outstanding and innovative suspension bridge designer.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Justin Russell (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Waldo-Hancock Suspension BridgeEra_date_from: 1931
Sewall's Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1761York RiverYorkState: MEZip: 03909Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Sewall-s-Bridge/Creator: Sewall, Samuel

Sewall's Bridge is a singular example of an era when wooden trestle bridges carried highway traffic across New England waterways. It is the earliest pile-trestle bridge for which an authentic construction record exists, and the oldest for which builder's drawings survive. Spanning the York River, it was named for Major Samuel Sewall, Jr., the civil engineer who designed and constructed it.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Public Domain (State Historical Society of Colorado)Image Caption: Sewall's BridgeEra_date_from: 1761
Portland Head Light
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1787Fort Williams ParkCape ElizabethState: MEZip: 04107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Portland-Head-Light/Creator: Nichols, John , Bryant, Jonathan

The Portland Head Light was the first lighthouse to be constructed in Maine and the first one completed and put into service by the Federal government under the Lighthouse Act of 1789, which moved to place all lighthouses under federal control. While work had begun on the lighthouse in 1787 by the State of Massachusetts which, at that time, had jurisdiction over Maine, it was completed by the Federal government. When this lighthouse was being built, Portland was the sixth largest port in the country, the closest port to Europe and had significant trade with the Caribbean.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Bernt Rostad (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Portland Head LightEra_date_from: 1787
Portland Observatory
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 1807Munjoy HillPortlandState: MEZip: 04101Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Portland-Observatory/Creator: Moody, Lemuel

The Portland Observatory was built in 1807 by Captain Lemuel Moody to serve as a communication station for Portland Harbor. Portland Observatory was one of the earliest marine signal stations in the United States, and it is the last known to survive. The Observatory's location on Munjoy Hill gave it a clear view of vessels approaching Portland Harbor. The Observatory contributed to the prosperity of Portland Harbor as a vital center of maritime commerce during the "Golden Age of Sail."  

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Econrad (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Portland ObservatoryEra_date_from: 1807
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, RoadSub Category: Road TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1910Lumberman's MuseumPattenState: MEZip: 04765Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/road-and-off-road-transportation/-79-lombard-steam-log-hauler-%281910%29Creator: Lombard, Alvin
This steam crawler-tractor emancipated horses from the killing work of hauling trains of sleds over iced roads in the winter woods of the United States and Canada. Designed, patented (1901), and built by Alvin C. Lombard (1856-1937) of Waterville, Maine, eighty-three "Lombards" were the first practical examples of the often-tried lag or crawler tread that would become the mark of the internal combustion engine-driven agricultural and construction equipment and military tank in current use.
YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/cliff1066,Image Caption: Lombard Steam Log HaulerEra_date_from: 1910
Bailey Island Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, TransportationEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 19281958 Harpswell Islands RdHarpswellState: MEZip: 04003Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/Bailey-Island-Bridge/Creator: Edwards, Llewelyn

Hardy fishermen and their families have long inhabited Bailey Island, which was settled in the 1720s. Ordinarily, they did not mind crossing to the mainland in their fishing boats. But before the Bailey Island Bridge was built, during certain seasons of the year when violent storms battered the coast, it was impossible to leave the island.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Swruler9284 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: A panoramic view of the length of the Bailey Island BridgeEra_date_from: 1928
Maine Turnpike
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1947Maine TurnpikeState: MECountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Maine-Turnpike/

Maine's heavy snows led turnpike maintenance personnel to bring "left-handed" snow plows into prominence. By using left-handed and traditional right-handed plows in tandem, they were able to distribute snow more evenly - an important advance that has been emulated by many highway maintenance crews across the country.

YearAdded:
1999
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doug Kerr (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Maine TurnpikeEra_date_from: 1947
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