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1870-1879

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Many people consider Alexander Graham Bell’s 1876 telephone patent to have been the most valuable ever issued by the U. S. Patent Office. In his recent book, The Telephone Gambit: Chasing Alexander Graham Bell’s Secret, author Seth Shulman claims that Bell “stole the key idea behind the invention of the telephone,” having copied the idea for a liquid transmitter from a patent caveat filed by rival Elisha Gray, and that Gray’s idea unlocked the secrets of the telephone for Bell.

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Lewis_Latimer
Born in Massachusetts in 1848, Latimer served in the U.S.
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Tower Silo
Society: ASABE Main Category: Agricultural & Biological Sub Category: Storage Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1873 Lyle C. Thomas Park Spring Grove State: IL Zip: 60081 Country: USA Website: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/tower-silo-18.aspx Creator: Hatch, Fred L.

First Tower Silo Designated A Historic Landmark Of  Agricultural Engineering. The First Tower Silo In America Was Erected Near This Site On The Hatch Farm, One Half-Mile East Of Spring Grove, Illinois. Fred L. Hatch And His Father, Lewis Hatch, Erected This Silo In October 1873, After Fred Graduated From The Illinois Industrial University. (Now The University Of Illinois). Textbooks On Agriculture Were Scarce, And Professor Willard F. Bliss Translated French And German Pamphlets On Silage Production Wherein The Entire Corn Plant Was Buried In Pits, And This Inspired Young Hatch.

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1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Doc Searls (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: A modern tower silo Era_date_from:
Pit Silo
Society: ASABE Main Category: Agricultural & Biological Sub Category: Storage Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876 Oakland Manor Columbia State: MD Zip: 21044 Country: USA Website: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/pit-silo-6.aspx Creator: Morris, Francis

Designated a Historic Landmark of Agricultural Engineering at Oakland Manor In 1876 Francis Morris Built Brick Silos in His Barn and Introduced the Practice of Making Corn Silage in the United States. His Further Experiments Developed the Use of Earthen Trenches and Thereby Significantly Contributed to the Development of American Agriculture Dedicated by Amercan Society of Agricultural Engineers 1976

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1976
Image Credit: Image Caption: A pit silo in Araguacema, circa 1964. This style of silage was originally conceived by Francis Morris in the 19th century. Era_date_from:
First Oil Tanker
Society: SPE Main Category: Petroleum Sub Category: Transportation Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1878 Bibi-Heybat State: Baku Zip: Country: Azerbaijan Website: http://www.spe.org/industry/history/timeline.php Creator: Nobel, Ludvig

 

The Zoroaster, commissioned and completed in 1878, is widely considered to be the world's first successful oil tanker. It was designed by Ludvig Nobel, who notably refused to patent any part of it, leading to the design being widely studied and duplicated around the world. The tanker was built in Gothemburg, Sweden and was intended to navigate the Caspian Sea, running between Baku, Azerbaijan and Astrakhan, Russia.

 

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John W. Draper
Society: ACS Main Category: Chemical Sub Category: People and Organizations Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876 New York University New York City State: NY Zip: Country: USA Website: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/draperacs.html Creator: Draper, John W.

The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, celebrated its 125th anniversary in 2001. Founded in 1876 in New York City, the Society now has 186 local sections in all 50 states, international chapters, and 32 technical divisions that bring together scientists with interests ranging from small business to environmental protection.

 

The text of the plaque commemorating the landmark reads:

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2001
Image Credit: public domain Image Caption: Portrait of John W. Draper, unknown date Era_date_from:
Society: IEEE Main Category: Electric Sub Category: Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876 Boston State: MA Zip: 02203 Country: USA Website: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Intelligible_Voice_Transmission_over_Electric_Wire,_1876 Creator: Bell, Alexander Graham

The first transmission of intelligible speech over electrical wires took place on 10 March 1876. Inventor Alexander Graham Bell called out to his assistant Thomas Watson, “Mr. Watson, come here! I want to see you.” This transmission took place in their attic laboratory located in a near here at 5 Exeter Place. A pioneer in the field of telecommunications, Alexander Graham Bell was born in 1847 in Edinburgh, Scotland. He moved to Ontario, and then to the United States, settling in Boston, before beginning his career as an inventor.

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2006
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEE Image Caption: The telephone used in the first intelligible transmission over electrical wires. Era_date_from: 1876
Bell
Society: IEEE Main Category: Electric Sub Category: Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876 Paris State: Ontario Zip: N3L 2M3 Country: Canada Website: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Distant_Speech_Transmission_in_Canada,_1876 Creator: Bell, Alexander Graham

On 10 August 1876, Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated on this site that the human voice could be transmitted electrically over distance. While family members spoke into a transmitter in Brantford, 13 km away, Bell was able to hear them at a receiver located in Paris. This test convinced Bell that his invention could be used for communication between towns and could compete successfully with the telegraph.  

 

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2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia Image Caption: Alexander Graham Bell Era_date_from: 1876
East Maui Irrigation System
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1876-1923 East Maui State: HI Zip: Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/East-Maui-Irrigation-System/ Creator: Henry Perrine Baldwin

The East Maui Irrigation System is Hawaii's most dramatic water story. It began with the construction of the Old Hamakua Ditch built between 1876 and 1878. This privately financed, constructed and managed irrigation system was one of the largest in the United States. It eventually included 50 miles of tunnels; 24 miles of open ditches, inverted siphons and flumes; incorporates approximately 400 intakes and 8 reservoirs.

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2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Will Scullin (CC BY 2.0) Image Caption: East Maui Irrigation Ditch Era_date_from: 1876
Society: ASCE Main Category: Civil Sub Category: Water Supply & Control Era: 1870-1879 DateCreated: 1875-1879 New Orleans State: LA Zip: 70113 Country: USA Website: http://www.asce.org/Project/Eads-South-Pass-Navigation-Works/ Creator: Eads, James Buchanan

"Eads had to succeed in the face of conventional wisdom which doomed him to disaster. Entrenched authorities not only completely dismissed his theories, but pointed to the indifferent European experiences with what he proposed."  
 - ASCE Landmark Nomination Proposal, 1982   

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1982
Image Credit: Image Caption: Era_date_from: 1875
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Innovations

Marlette Lake Water System

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Sholes & Glidden 'Type Writer'

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Duquesne Incline

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Eads Bridge

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Modified Fink trussed Girder bridge

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Kamehameha V Post Office

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keeseville

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Monongahela Incline

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Pelton Impulse Water Wheel

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Pioneer Oil Refinery California Star Oil Works

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Ponte Maria Pia Bridge

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Siegfried Marcus Car

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