Skip to main content

1930

Hume-Love Cutterbar and Reel
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930Horn School Rest AreaRosaliaState: WAZip: 99170Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/hume-love-cutterbar-29.aspxCreator: Hume, Horace D.

Near This Location In The 1930's James E. Love And Horace D. Hume Of Garfield, Washington, Invented The Flexible Floating Cutterbar And The Tined Pickup Reel To Harvest Low-Growing, Fragile Crops. These Devices Were Developed For The Local Crops Of Dry Peas And Lentils And Were Then Adopted Nationwide To Soybeans And Other Low-Growing Crops That Tangle And Lodge. These Mechanisms Reduced Dry Pea Harvesting Costs By 28% And Crop Loss From 50 To 10%. These Inventions Were Reported To Save The Equivalent Of 2,750,000 Acres Of Soybeans Annually.

YearAdded:
1993
Part of the Purdue Cirrus training fleet on the ramp
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: EducationEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930Purdue University AirportWest LafayettaState: INCountry: USAWebsite: https://engineering.purdue.edu/AAE/aboutus/history/gallery/Z-AIAAHistoryofAAE.pdf, https://engineering.purdue.edu/aiaa/, https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/

The Purdue University Airport was the first collegiate owned airport in the United States. It hosted Amelia Earhart for her final adventure, was the training ground for test pilots such a Jimmy Johnson and Ivan Kincheloe, balloonist Malcolm Ross, and astronaut Neil Armstrong. Purdue University Airport and its people and programs pushed aviation’s evolution to new heights and helped expand the frontiers of flight. During WWII, hundreds of U.S. Army and Navy members were trained at the airport.

Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/SkyHigh757 (CC BY-SA 4.0)Image Caption: Part of the Purdue Cirrus training fleet on the ramp
Tunnel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1930Zion - Mount Carmel HwyHurricaneState: UTCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/zion-mt--carmel-tunnel---hwy/

With the dawn of the automobile age at the beginning of the Twentieth Century, the entire nation started to demand better roads. In the 1910s, motorists and businessmen in Utah became aware of the possibilities of tourism as a business. Soon the state of Utah and the federal government responded with a decades-long program to improve transportation to and within Zion National Park.

Several factors argued for a road through Zion National Park: 

Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ken Lund (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The spectacular scenery of Zion National Park along the Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, S.R. 9, east of the Zion tunnel.
White River Concrete Arch Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930White RiverCotterState: ARZip: 72626Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/White-River-Concrete-Arch-Bridge/Creator: Marsh, James Barney

When this 1,850-foot concrete-arch highway bridge was built on the White River in a remote region of northern Arkansas - prior to the construction of upriver, flood-control dams - flash floods occurred frequently, sometimes causing the water to rise as much as one foot per hour. Construction under these conditions presented a clear danger, so project managers specified both a design and an innovative construction method appropriate to the problem of building across a perilous stretch of unpredictable river.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/jaystout (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: White River Concrete Arch BridgeEra_date_from: 1930
Salginatobel Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930Salgina Valley ravineSchiersState: GraubündenCountry: SwitzerlandWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Salginatobel-Bridge/Creator: Maillart, Robert

The Salginatobel Bridge, spanning the Salgina Valley ravine, is the earliest surviving three-hinged, hollow box arch bridge designed by  Robert Maillart.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Rama (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Salginatobel BridgeEra_date_from: 1930
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930ABB Combustion EngineeringChattanoogaState: TNZip: 37402Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-44-fusion-welded-test-boiler-drum-%281930%29Creator: Combustion Engineering Inc., Moses, A. J.
This fusion-welded drum, tested during 1930, was the first in a series tested at Combustion Engineering Inc. that led to the industrial acceptance of welding for the fabrication of boiler drums. Replacing riveting for steam power plants, electric arc fusion welding permitted increased efficiencies through higher working pressures and temperatures and fabrication of larger units of improved safety. Welding was then rapidly extended to fabrication using optimum alloys for pressure vessel and structural application. Papers published by A. J.
YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Image source: Engrailhistory.infoImage Caption: Fusion-welded Test Boiler DrumEra_date_from: 1930
Detroit-Windsor Tunnel
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: TunnelsEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930-Windsor TunnelDetroitState: MIZip: 48226Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/Detroit-Windsor-Tunnel/Creator: Value, Burnside, Thoresen, Søren Anton

The Detroit-Windsor Tunnel is a 5,160-foot structure that carries traffic under the Detroit River between Detroit, Michigan and Ontario, Canada. Privately financed, built, and owned, it was completed in 26 months, 10 months ahead of schedule. 

YearAdded:
1982
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Brian Rawson-Ketchum (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Detroit-Windsor TunnelEra_date_from: 1930
Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930Veterans Memorial BridgeWest HempfieldState: PACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Columbia-Wrightsville-Bridge/Creator: Long, James , Wiley-Maxon Construction Company

The total length of the Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge is 7,374 feet. Its construction required 100,000 cubic yards of concrete and 8 million pounds of steel reinforcing rods.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Gerry Dincher (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Columbia-Wrightsville BridgeEra_date_from: 1930
Subscribe to 1930
Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.