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First Transpacific Reception of a Television (TV) Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1963Ibaraki Satellite Communication CenterTakahagiZip: 318-0022Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transpacific_Reception_of_a_Television_%28TV%29_Signal_via_Satellite,_1963

On 23 November 1963, this site received the first transpacific transmission of a TV signal from Mojave earth station in California, U.S.A., via the Relay 1 communications satellite. The Ibaraki earth station used a 20m Cassegrain antenna, the first use of this type of antenna for commercial telecommunications. This event demonstrated the capability and impact of satellite communications and helped open a new era of intercontinental live TV programming relayed via satellite.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Caption: Artist's vision of NASA Relay 1 satelliteEra_date_from: 1963
Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1980-1989DateCreated: 1984NHK Science and Technology Research LaboratoriesTokyoCountry: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Direct_Broadcast_Satellite_Service,_1984Creator: NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation)

NHK began the world's first direct broadcast satellite service in May, 1984. This was the culmination of eighteen years of research that included the development of an inexpensive low-noise receiver and investigations of rain attenuation in the 12 GHz band. RRL, NASDA, TSCJ, Toshiba Corporation, General Electric Company, and NASA participated with NHK to make satellite broadcasting to the home a practical reality.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Makro Freak (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: A modern parabolic satellite communications antenna at Erdfunkstelle RaistingEra_date_from: 1984
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1924Tohoku University Sendai-shiCountry: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Directive_Short_Wave_Antenna,_1924Creator: Hidetsugu Yagi, Uda, Shintaro
Beginning in 1924, Professor Hidetsugu Yagi and his assistant, Shintaro Uda, designed and constructed a sensitive and highly-directional antenna using closely-coupled parasitic elements. The antenna, which is effective in the higher-frequency ranges, has been important for radar, television, and amateur radio. The antenna system, using a driven element with closely coupled parasitics (usually a reflector and one or more directors) for short-wave work, was first described by S. Uda, a professor at Tohuku University in Japan, in 1926, in the IEEJ (Japan). A colleague, Professor H.
YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy IEEEImage Caption: The Yagi-Uda directive short wave antennaEra_date_from: 1924
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1976JVC Yokosuka PlantYokosukaZip: 239-8550Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Development_of_VHS,_a_World_Standard_for_Home_Video_Recording,_1976Creator: Takano, Shizuo, Shiraishi, Yuma
At the Yokohama Plant of Victor Company of Japan, Limited, a team of engineers headed by Shizuo Takano and Yuma Shiraishi developed VHS (Video Home System) format. They looked ahead to the need for home video tape recorders and embodied their idea in unique inventions. The first model JVC HR-3300 was announced on 9 September 1976. Their basic design with subsequent improvement gained wide customer acceptance.
YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy WikipediaImage Caption: The HR-3300 Eg, a revision of the original HR-3300 that revolutionized the VHS.Era_date_from: 1976
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1930-1945Tokyo Institute of TechnologyNikahoCountry: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Development_of_Ferrite_Materials_and_Their_Applications,_1930-1945Creator: Takei, Takeshi
Dr. Takeshi Takei, the professor at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, discovered that composite oxides containing zinc and iron have distinguished magnetic properties. In 1930, Prof. Takei submitted a paper on his work to Japanese Electro-chemical Society and also presented a paper at 57th General Meeting of American Electrochemical Society in St. Louis. That same year, Prof. Takei applied a patent for his discovery, which was granted in 1932(Japan PAT-98844). Tokyo Denki Kagaku Kogyo (now TDK Corporation) was founded in 1935 to commercialize this newly invented ferrite cores.
YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Tokyo Institute of TechnologyImage Caption: A replica of the early soft-ferrite core.Era_date_from: 1930
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1924-1941Shizuoka UniversityHamamatsu Zip: 432-8011Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Development_of_Electronic_Television,_1924-1941Creator: Kenjiro Takayanagi
Professor Kenjiro Takayanagi started his research program in television at Hamamatsu Technical College (now Shizuoka University) in 1924. He transmitted an image of the Japanese character イ(i) on a cathode-ray tube on 25 December 1926 and broadcast video over an electronic television system in 1935. His work, patents, articles, and teaching helped lay the foundation for the rise of Japanese television and related industries to global leadership. The milestone plaque may be viewed at the site of the research at Hamamatsu Technical College (now Shizuoka University).
YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/sphlImage Caption: A recreation of Professor Takayanagi's first demonstration of television on display at Shizuoka University.Era_date_from: 1924
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1959OsakaCountry: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Commercialization_and_Industrialization_of_Photovoltaic_Cells,_1959Creator: Sharp Corporation
In 1954 three researchers at Bell Laboratories published the results of their discovery of the world’s first practical ‘photovoltaic’ (henceforth abbreviated by ‘PV’) cell which was capable of converting sunlight into electricity, first at 4% and later at 6% conversion-efficiency[1]. In 1959 Sharp Corporation began R&D of silicon monocrystal PV-cells, with mass production starting in 1963[2], and commercialized a variety of mono/multi-crystalline PV-cells for everything from satellites to lighthouses, and industrial applications to residential use[2].
Image Credit: Courtesy NRELImage Caption: Silicon solar array connected to the roof of a commercial building.Era_date_from: 1959
Tokaido Shinkansen
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Tokyo Station
State: Tokyo-toZip: 100-0005Country: JapanWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/211-tokaido-shinkansenCreator: Shima, Hideo

In 1964, Shinkansen (which means "new trunk line" and is also known as the bullet train) between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka became the world's first high-speed railway system, running at a maximum business speed of over 200 km/h (130-160 mph). 

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Roger Wollstadt (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Tokaido ShinkansenEra_date_from: 1964
JR Central 700 Series Shinkansen set C40 on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen between Kakegawa and Shizuoka Station
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Tokyo to ShimonosekiNagoyaState: Ch?bu regionZip: 100-0005Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Tokaido_Shinkansen_%28Bullet_Train%29,_1964Creator: Shima, Hideo

The Tokaido Shinkansen, the world's first inter-city, high-speed railway system, began operations on its route of over 500 kilometers between Tokyo and Osaka more than thirty years ago, in 1964. After its establishment, the Tokaido Shinkansen made a major contribution to Japan's rapid post-war economic growth as the country's principal transportation artery. Today (1997), more than two hundred and eighty Shinkansen trains operate between Tokyo and Osaka each day, with eleven departures an hour at peak times, and a daily ridership of more than 360,000 passengers.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: JR Central 700 Series Shinkansen set C40 on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen between Kakegawa and Shizuoka StationEra_date_from: 1964
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