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Tokaido Shinkansen
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Tokyo Station
State: Tokyo-toZip: 100-0005Country: JapanWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/211-tokaido-shinkansenCreator: Shima, Hideo

In 1964, Shinkansen (which means "new trunk line" and is also known as the bullet train) between Tokyo and Shin-Osaka became the world's first high-speed railway system, running at a maximum business speed of over 200 km/h (130-160 mph). 

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Roger Wollstadt (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Tokaido ShinkansenEra_date_from: 1964
JR Central 700 Series Shinkansen set C40 on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen between Kakegawa and Shizuoka Station
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Tokyo to ShimonosekiNagoyaState: Ch?bu regionZip: 100-0005Country: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Tokaido_Shinkansen_%28Bullet_Train%29,_1964Creator: Shima, Hideo

The Tokaido Shinkansen, the world's first inter-city, high-speed railway system, began operations on its route of over 500 kilometers between Tokyo and Osaka more than thirty years ago, in 1964. After its establishment, the Tokaido Shinkansen made a major contribution to Japan's rapid post-war economic growth as the country's principal transportation artery. Today (1997), more than two hundred and eighty Shinkansen trains operate between Tokyo and Osaka each day, with eleven departures an hour at peak times, and a daily ridership of more than 360,000 passengers.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Caption: JR Central 700 Series Shinkansen set C40 on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen between Kakegawa and Shizuoka StationEra_date_from: 1964
Pilatusbahn - the world's steepest cog railway
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1882Brünigstrasse 4
605
AlpnachCountry: SwitzerlandWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/220-pilatusbahn, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/8c4b369d-83fd-4b9e-9248-b6d78b28628c/220-Pilatusbahn-1882.aspxCreator: Locher, Eduard , Locher Systems

The Pilatusbahn—the steepest rack railway in the world—has operated successfully since its opening in 1889 over a route of 4.62 kilometers (2.87 miles) between Alpnachstad on Lake Lucerne and Pilatus Kulm, rising 6,791 feet (2,070 meters) above sea level. This results in a gradient of 48%, or a rise of nearly one meter in two meters of run on the steepest sections of the line, which amounts to about a quarter of its length.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Stephane Dewarrat (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: PilatusbahnEra_date_from: 1882
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, MechanicalSub Category: Rail Transportation, EntertainmentEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1959DisneylandAnaheimState: CAZip: 92803Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-115-disneyland-monorail-system-%281959%29Creator: Wenner-Gren, Axel, ALWEG
Disney engineers designed this monorail system based on the system developed by Axel Wenner-Gren of the Alweg Company in Cologne, West Germany. Wenner-Gren ran his experimental monorail in 1952 on a level track, and when adopted by Disney in 1959, it was designed to simulate the terrain typical of urban transit. Opening in 1959, the system has been in continuous operation as a passenger service carrying an average of 340,000 passengers a year and logging 10,000 miles. The original trains were replaced in 1969 and a new fleet introduced in 1987 to upgrade the existing chassis.
YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/prayitno (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Disneyland Monorail SystemEra_date_from: 1959
Conwy Tubular Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Roads & RailsEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1849River ConwyState: North WhalesCountry: UKWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Conwy-Tubular-Bridge/Creator: Stephenson, Robert

Built by Robert Stephenson to carry the Chester and Holyhead Railway across the River Conwy, this bridge was erected between 1846 and 1848. It consists of a single span 400 feet long, formed by two parallel rectangular wrought iron tubes, each weighing 1300 tons. Masonry towers were built on the abutments and topped with battlements and turrets to harmonize with the nearby Conwy Castle. The Conwy Tubular Bridge was the first railway bridge in which trains ran through the main girders. It represents a pioneering use of wrought iron for bridges.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Original Photo: Flickr/Glenn J. MasonImage Caption: Conwy Tubular BridgeEra_date_from: 1849
Penn. RR GG1 Electric Locomotive #4800
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1943Railroad Museum of PennsylvanniaStrasburgState: PAZip: 17579Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---1/-83-penn--rr-gg1-electric-locomotive--4800-%281943%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/2ac536d7-b8ba-4eb2-a651-292fb81709e4/83-Penn-RR-GG1-Electric-Locomotive-4800-1943.aspx, http://www.steamlocomotive.com/pennsy/rmopCreator: Baldwin Locomotive Works, General Electric Company

The 4,620-horsepower GG1 was primarily a passenger locomotive, routinely operating at over 100 miles per hour, but was used in freight service as well. Conceived by the Pennsylvania Railroad and built by the Baldwin Locomotive Works and General Electric Company, No. 4800 logged nearly 5 million miles in its forty-five-year life. It was the prototype for a 139-unit fleet built during a decade to serve on the PRR's electrified lines, and the only one with a riveted body shell; the remainder were welded.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/dmb201Image Caption: Penn. RR GG1 Electric Locomotive #4800Era_date_from: 1943
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