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Wrought Iron

Whipple Truss Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1855SchenectadyState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Whipple-Truss-Bridge/Creator: Whipple, Squire

The Whipple Bowstring Truss Bridge was built from a design patented in 1841 by Squire Whipple. Whipple was the first person to understand the stresses in truss members and he developed the first theoretical formula to calculate stresses in the articulated truss. His bowstring truss was the first to use cast iron for compression and wrought iron for tension membranes.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/RehrenbergImage Caption: A Whipple Bowstring Arch/Truss style bridge, built by S. DeGraff in Albany, NYEra_date_from: 1855
Tennessee State Capitol
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1845-1877Tennessee State CapitolNashvilleState: TNZip: 37219Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Tennessee-State-Capitol/Creator: Strickland, William , Bogart, John

The Tennessee State Capitol, the first and only home of the Tennessee General Assembly, was designed by engineer and architect William Strickland. Since its construction, it has ably served, with little modification, as the seat of Tennessee's government.

YearAdded:
2003
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Ron CogswellImage Caption: Tennessee State CapitolEra_date_from: 1845
Moseley Wrought Iron Arch Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1864North CanalNorth AndoverState: MAZip: 01845Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Moseley-Wrought-Iron-Arch-Bridge/Creator: Moseley Iron Building Works

Designed, patented, and built by Thomas W.H. Moseley, this arched 96-foot span bridge preceded by years the standard use of wrought iron for bridges. For the first time in the United States, Moseley incorporated the use of riveted wrought-iron plates for the triangular-shaped top chord.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Elizabeth Thomsen (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Moseley Arch, Merrimack College, North Andover, MassachusettsEra_date_from: 1864
Modified Fink trussed Girder bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1870Riverside ParkLynchburgState: VICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Fink-Deck-Truss-Bridge/Creator: Fink, Albert

The Fink Deck Truss Bridge is thought to have been originally used on the Norfolk and Western mainline railway. It was moved to its present location and converted to a vehicular bridge over a railroad spur in 1893 when the Norfolk and Western mainline was moved. It was relocated again in 1985 to Lynchburg's Riverside Park to serve as a pedestrian bridge.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Caption: Modified Fink trussed Girder bridgeEra_date_from: 1870
Conwy Tubular Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, Roads & RailsEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1849River ConwyState: North WhalesCountry: UKWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Conwy-Tubular-Bridge/Creator: Stephenson, Robert

Built by Robert Stephenson to carry the Chester and Holyhead Railway across the River Conwy, this bridge was erected between 1846 and 1848. It consists of a single span 400 feet long, formed by two parallel rectangular wrought iron tubes, each weighing 1300 tons. Masonry towers were built on the abutments and topped with battlements and turrets to harmonize with the nearby Conwy Castle. The Conwy Tubular Bridge was the first railway bridge in which trains ran through the main girders. It represents a pioneering use of wrought iron for bridges.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Original Photo: Flickr/Glenn J. MasonImage Caption: Conwy Tubular BridgeEra_date_from: 1849
Saugus Ironworks
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1600sDateCreated: 1647 Ironworks National Historic SiteSaugusState: MAZip: 01906Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-7-saugus-ironworks-%281647%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/f0a3f427-43a2-4371-aa52-73a1b579d9e0/7-Saugus-Ironworks.aspxCreator: Winthrop the Younger, John

The Saugus Ironworks, the first commercial ironworks in North America, was an impressive technological achievement for an early colony. The same basic processes are used today: reducing iron oxide with carbon to produce metallic iron that can be cast in a mold, producing wrought iron by puddling cast iron, and fabricating wrought iron with power hammer and rolls.

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Kristin Shoemaker (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: One of the Saugus Ironworks' water wheels in motionEra_date_from: 1647
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