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First Transatlantic Reception of a Television Signal via Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1962Parc du Radôme
Pleumeur-BodouCountry: FranceWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Transatlantic_Reception_of_a_Television_Signal_via_Satellite,_1962

On 11 July 1962 a station in Pimsleur-Bodou received the first transatlantic transmission of a TV signal from a twin station in Andover, Maine, USA via the TELSTAR satellite. The success of TELSTAR and the earth stations, the first built for active satellite communications, illustrated the potential of a future world-wide satellite system to provide communications between continents.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Nicholas Lannuzel (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Radome in Pimsleur-Bodou.Era_date_from: 1962
Satellite
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricEra: 1980-1989DateCreated: 1984NHK Science and Technology Research LaboratoriesTokyoCountry: JapanWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:First_Direct_Broadcast_Satellite_Service,_1984Creator: NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation)

NHK began the world's first direct broadcast satellite service in May, 1984. This was the culmination of eighteen years of research that included the development of an inexpensive low-noise receiver and investigations of rain attenuation in the 12 GHz band. RRL, NASDA, TSCJ, Toshiba Corporation, General Electric Company, and NASA participated with NHK to make satellite broadcasting to the home a practical reality.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Makro Freak (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: A modern parabolic satellite communications antenna at Erdfunkstelle RaistingEra_date_from: 1984
Saturn V Rocket
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1967John F. Kennedy Space CenterOrlandoState: FLZip: 32899Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-54-saturn-v-rocket-%281967%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/fb4f1d1d-a005-46d5-b237-19f15b8e6549/52-Saturn-V-Rocket.aspxCreator: NASA

The largest rocket built at the time of the historic first missions to the moon, the Saturn V carried aloft the 45-ton Apollo spacecraft on earth orbital and lunar missions from 1967 to 1972. It also launched the 120-ton Skylab into earth orbit on May 14, 1973. 

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: The largest rocket engines built at the time of the first US missions to the moon.Era_date_from: 1967
RL-10 Rocket Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Smithsonian National Air and Space MuseumWashingtonState: DCZip: 20560Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-36-rl-10-rocket-engine-%281958%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/e04882e6-5b54-404f-b634-f7e4d4494067/36-RL-10-Rocket-Engine.aspxCreator: Pratt & Whitney

The RL-10, which served as the power plant for NASA's upper-stage Centaur space launch vehicle, was the first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as a fuel. It has provided precisely controlled, reliable power for lunar and planetary explorations. The RL-10 embodied numerous advanced design features, including multiple use of its fuel with the "bootstrap cycle." The RL-10 is also capable of multiple restarts in space, which enables positioning of satellites or further escape of Earth's gravity.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: The first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as fuel.Era_date_from: 1958
Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1967Apollo RoadACTState: ACTZip: 2620Country: AustraliaWebsite: http://intranet.aiaa.org/industryresources/PDF/AustraliaHistoricSitesPR.pdf, https://www.honeysucklecreek.net/images/AIAA/AIAA_Booklet_HSK-ORR-TID.pdfCreator: NASA

Established between 1967, the Honeysuckle Creek Tracking Station, along with the Tidbinbilla and Orroral Valley sites, supported NASA’s Deep Space Network, Manned Space Flight Network, and Spacecraft Tracking and Data Acquisition Network. The stations played a key role in supporting the Apollo 11 moon landing, with the Honeysuckle Creek facility providing the first historic pictures of man walking on the moon on July 20, 1969 (July 21st in Australia), as well as providing voice and telemetry contact with the lunar module.

YearAdded:
2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/wxwhyz (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Honeysuckle Creek Tracking StationEra_date_from: 1967
Orroral Valley Tracking Station
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1965LOT 8 Orroral RdTennent CreeState: ACTZip: 2620Country: AustraliaWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/, https://www.honeysucklecreek.net/images/AIAA/AIAA_Booklet_HSK-ORR-TID.pdfCreator: NASA

Established 1965 the Orroral Valley Station, as well as the Honeysuckle Creek (1967) and Tidbinbilla (1965) sites supported NASA’s Deep Space Network, Manned Space Flight Network, and Spacecraft Tracking and Data Acquisition Network. The stations played a key role in supporting the Apollo 11 moon landing, with the Honeysuckle Creek facility providing the first historic pictures of man walking on the moon on July 20, 1969 (July 21st in Australia), as well as providing voice and telemetry contact with the lunar module.

YearAdded:
2010
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Percita (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Orroral Valley Tracking StationEra_date_from: 1965
Tidbinbilla Tracking Station
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1965Tidbinbilla Nature ReservePaddys RiverState: ACTZip: 2620Country: AustraliaWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/HistoricAerospaceSites/Creator: Menzies, Robert, NASA

Established 1965 the Tidbinbilla Tracking Station, as well as the Honeysuckle Creek (1967-1981) and Orroral Valley (1965-1985) sites, supported NASA’s Deep Space Network, Manned Space Flight Network, and Spacecraft Tracking and Data Acquisition Network. The stations played a key role in supporting the Apollo 11 moon landing, with the Honeysuckle Creek facility providing the first historic pictures of man walking on the moon on July 20, 1969 (July 21st in Australia), as well as providing voice and telemetry contact with the lunar module.

YearAdded:
2010
Image Credit: Original Image: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: Tidbinbilla Tracking StationEra_date_from: 1965
NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Research and DevelopmentEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1956NASA Ames Research CenterMoffett FieldState: CAZip: 94035Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/research-and-development/-187-nasa-ames-unitary-plan-wind-tunnel-%281956%29

This wind tunnel complex was developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NASA's predecessor) to serve the emerging need for supersonic research and development following World War II. The three-testing-section configuration covers Mach number .03-3.5 and utilizes a single common drive and two compressors.

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: NASA Ames Unitary Plan Wind TunnelEra_date_from: 1956
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: ResearchEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1939Moffett FieldMountain ViewState: CAZip: 94035Country: USAWebsite: http://intranet.aiaa.org/industryresources/PDF/AmesFinalPR.pdfCreator: National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

Established in 1939 by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), and named after NACA’s first chairman, Joseph S. Ames, the center has been at the forefront of American, and worldwide, aeronautics research.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: NASA Ames Research CenterEra_date_from: 1939
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1964Marshall Space Flight CenterHuntsvilleState: ALZip: 35808Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-170-advanced-engine-test-facility-at-marshall-%2819Creator: von Braun, Wernher
The Advanced Engine Test Facility was built in 1964, three years after President John F. Kennedy committed the United States to world leadership in aeronautical science. Conceived and designed by Wernher von Braun, the first director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, this facility was used to perform static tests on the booster of the Saturn V rocket, which launched Apollo 11 to the moon on July 16, 1969. The stand has four concrete legs, each four feet thick and rising 144 feet to a steel superstructure supporting a 200-ton crane.
YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Saturn V Rocket being lifted onto the A-2 Test Stand at NASA's John C. Stennis Space CenterEra_date_from: 1964
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