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RL-10 Rocket Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AerospaceEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1958Smithsonian National Air and Space MuseumWashingtonState: DCZip: 20560Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/air-and-space-transportation/-36-rl-10-rocket-engine-%281958%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/e04882e6-5b54-404f-b634-f7e4d4494067/36-RL-10-Rocket-Engine.aspxCreator: Pratt & Whitney

The RL-10, which served as the power plant for NASA's upper-stage Centaur space launch vehicle, was the first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as a fuel. It has provided precisely controlled, reliable power for lunar and planetary explorations. The RL-10 embodied numerous advanced design features, including multiple use of its fuel with the "bootstrap cycle." The RL-10 is also capable of multiple restarts in space, which enables positioning of satellites or further escape of Earth's gravity.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Public Domain (NASA)Image Caption: The first rocket engine to use high-energy liquid hydrogen as fuel.Era_date_from: 1958
Washington Monument
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1885101-199 15th St SW
WashingtonState: DCCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Washington-Monument/Creator: Casey, Thomas Lincoln

Upon its dedication in 1885, the Washington Monument was the tallest structure in the world. Begun in 1848 to honor George Washington, the structure wasn't completed for over 36 years. Construction and financing problems slowed progress and the Civil War halted it completely.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Sebastien Fuss (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Washington MonumentEra_date_from: 1885
U.S. Capitol
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1793Capitol HillWashingtonState: DCZip: C 20016Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/U-S--Capitol/Creator: Thornton, William , Latrobe, Benjamin

The United States Capitol is among the most symbolically important and architecturally impressive buildings in the nation. Construction of the original Capitol began in 1793, but it has been through several additions and alterations. Over its lifetime, the Capitol building has been built, burnt, rebuilt, extended, and restored.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jiuguang Wang (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: U.S. CapitolEra_date_from: 1793
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Equipment, Harvesting and BalingEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1943National Museum of History & TechnologyWashingtonState: DCZip: 20560Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/old-red-cotton-picker-10.aspxCreator: Rust, John, Rust, Mack
"The development of the cotton picker was the most important single factor which enabled the American cotton industry to stay alive," observed Dr. George S. Buck, Jr., director of research for the National Cotton Council recenty. Some 96% of the 1969 U.S. cotton crop was harvested by machines, points out J.W. Wegener, manager of International Harvester's Memphis Works manager. "Old Red" was built by International Harvester in 1943, retired in 1959, and restored in 1964.
YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Photo Courtesy of ASABEImage Caption: "Old Red" now resides in the National Museum of History & Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.Era_date_from: 1943
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