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1862

USS Cairo Engine and Boilers
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1862 National BattlefieldVicksburgState: MSZip: 39183Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-143-uss-cairo-engine-and-boilers-%281862%29Creator: Pook, Samuel , Eads, James

The Cairo is the sole survivor of the fleet of river gunboats built by the Union during the Civil War with the object of controlling the lower Mississippi River. Designed by Samuel Pook and built by James B. Eads, it saw limited battle and was sunk on the Yazoo River in 1862 by newly developed electronically detonated mines, becoming the first craft ever sunk by this predecessor to torpedo technology. The 175-foot ironclad vessel had 13 guns.

Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/James Case (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: USS Cairo Engine and BoilersEra_date_from: 1862
Mullan Road
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Roads & RailsEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1862Mullan RdWalla WallaState: WAZip: 99371Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Mullan-Road/Creator: Mullan, John

The Mullan Road was designed to facilitate the movement of troops and supplies across the Rocky Mountains between the Missouri River basin in the Great Plains and the Columbia River Basin at the Columbia Plateau during times of Indian hostilities. But because peace was reached with the Northwest Indians early on, the road was used only once (in 1860) for military means. Instead, it became a popular thoroughfare for emigrants and fortune-seekers during the Montana and Idaho gold rushes of the 1860s. 

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Originally Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Mullan RoadEra_date_from: 1862
Bridgeport Covered Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Bridges, TransportationEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1862Yuba RiverPenn ValleyState: CAZip: 95946Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Bridgeport-Covered-Bridge/Creator: Virginia City Turnpike Company, Burr, Theodore

A product of the Northern California Gold Rush, the Bridgeport Covered Bridge is believed to be the longest, single-span, wooden covered bridge in the United States. Crossing the south fork of the Yuba River at a span of 233 feet, the bridge was built by the Virginia City Turnpike Company as part of a 14-mile toll road authorized by the California state legislature. The toll road was an essential link connecting Virginia City, Nevada, and the silver-producing Comstock Lode with the centers of California commerce.

YearAdded:
1970
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Rick Cooper (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The Bridgeport Covered Bridge, one of the longest covered bridges in the nationEra_date_from: 1862
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