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USS Cairo Engine and Boilers
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1862 National BattlefieldVicksburgState: MSZip: 39183Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-143-uss-cairo-engine-and-boilers-%281862%29Creator: Pook, Samuel , Eads, James

The Cairo is the sole survivor of the fleet of river gunboats built by the Union during the Civil War with the object of controlling the lower Mississippi River. Designed by Samuel Pook and built by James B. Eads, it saw limited battle and was sunk on the Yazoo River in 1862 by newly developed electronically detonated mines, becoming the first craft ever sunk by this predecessor to torpedo technology. The 175-foot ironclad vessel had 13 guns.

Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/James Case (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: USS Cairo Engine and BoilersEra_date_from: 1862
SS Badger Carferry
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1952Lake MichiganLudingtonState: MIZip: 49431Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-191-ss-badger-carferry-%281952%29Creator: Christy Corporation, Skinner Engine Company

The two 3,500-hp steeple compound Unaflow steam engines powering the S.S. Badger represent one of the last types of reciprocating marine steam engines. Built by the Skinner Engine Company, most Unaflow engines are single expansion. These feature tandem high- and low-pressure cylinders separated by a common head. The Badger's four Foster-Wheeler Type D marine boilers, which supply 470-psig steam to the engines, are among the last coal-fired marine boilers built. 

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/ssbadger (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: SS Badger CarferryEra_date_from: 1952
Siegfried Marcus Car
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, RoadSub Category: Road TransportationEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: ca. 1875Technical Museum
ViennaCountry: AustriaWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/road-and-off-road-transportation/-203-siegfried-marcus-car-%28ca--1875%29Creator: Marcus, Siegfried

Siegfried Marcus (1833-1898), a remarkable engineer and manufacturer, lived most of his life and died in Vienna, leaving his most important legacy — an experimental automobile resembling today's modern car and the oldest extant automobile known worldwide. Marcus' second car, built circa 1875 (a more specific date still being investigated by historians), is believed to be the first vehicle powered by a four-cycle engine and the first to use gasoline as a fuel, featuring the first carburetor for a gasoline engine and the first magneto ignition.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Siegfried Marcus CarEra_date_from: ca. 1875
Rumely Companies' Agricultural Products
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 18531007 Lincolnway La PorteState: INCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-225-rumely-companies--agricultural-products-%281853, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/d44ed4fd-8920-4082-9a6a-b0a7a4f0c99a/225-Rumely-Companies-Agricultural-Products.aspxCreator: Rumely, Meinrad

Beginning with the blacksmith shop of German immigrant Meinrad Rumely (1823-1904), this successive family of firms invented and produced a line of agricultural equipment that played a vital role in the evolution of farming based on the muscle of humans and animals to one based on the power of the steam and ultimately the internal-combustion engine. The M. & J. Rumely Co. became the M. Rumely Co., and then the Advance Rumely Co. The Allis-Chalmers Company acquired the business in 1931.

Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/BulldozerD11 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Rumely Companies' Agricultural ProductsEra_date_from: 1853
Joshua Hendy Iron Works
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1906401 E Hendy AveSunnyvaleState: CAZip: 94086Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/-34-joshua-hendy-iron-works-%281906%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/4c99ebb6-8005-461a-a215-0af2f8eaf17c/34-Joshua-Hendy-Iron-Works.aspxCreator: Hendy, Joshua

This ironworks exemplified the adaptability required for industrial survival in a dynamic technical environment. It was a major western producer of mechanical equipment used in mining (especially large hydraulic machines), ship propulsion, irrigation, power generation, optical telescope mounts, and nuclear research.

YearAdded:
1978
Image Credit: Public DomainImage Caption: Joshua Hendy Iron WorksEra_date_from: 1906
Society: ASMEMain Category: CivilSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903Charles CityState: IACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-190-hart-parr-tractor-%281903%29Creator: Hart, Charles Walter
This landmark artifact represents the first commercially successful farm tractor in the world powered by an internal-combustion engine. It was invented and built by Charles W. Hart and Charles H. Parr in Charles City, Iowa, as their Model 3, following two prototype versions.
YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Norbert Schnitzler (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Hart Parr TractorEra_date_from: 1903
Edison 'Jumbo' Engine-Driver Dynamo
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1882Henry Ford MuseumDearbornState: MIZip: 48124Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-48-edison--jumbo--engine-driver-dynamo-%281882%29Creator: Edison, Thomas

This dynamo, connected directly to a high-speed steam engine, was one of six that produced direct current at Thomas A. Edison's electric power station at 257 Pearl Street in New York City. The Pearl Street Station was the prototype for central station power generation. Edison set out in 1878 to provide an electrical distribution system to bring lighting into the home: His first filament lamp lit on October 21, 1879. With the help of Frances Upton and C.L. Clarke, Edison built his engine-driven dynamo for the 1881 Paris Electrical Exposition.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Caption: Edison jumbo dynamoEra_date_from: 1882
Cruquius Pumping Station
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1840-1849DateCreated: 1849Cruquiusdijk 27
HaarlemmermeerCountry: NetherlandsWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-153-cruquius-pumping-station-%281849%29Creator: Cruquius, Nicolaus Samuel , Beijerinck, Jan Anne

This is one of three nearly identical pumping stations that drained the Haarlemmermeer (Haarlem Lake), 1849- 52, then continued to maintain the polder's water table for more than 80 years. The Haarlemmermeer area covers 45,000 acres (about 70 square miles) in a triangular region between the cities of Amsterdam, Haarlem, and Leiden.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Mirko Junge (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Cruquius Pumping StationEra_date_from: 1849
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