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Siegfried Marcus Car
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, RoadSub Category: Road TransportationEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: ca. 1875Technical Museum
ViennaCountry: AustriaWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/road-and-off-road-transportation/-203-siegfried-marcus-car-%28ca--1875%29Creator: Marcus, Siegfried

Siegfried Marcus (1833-1898), a remarkable engineer and manufacturer, lived most of his life and died in Vienna, leaving his most important legacy — an experimental automobile resembling today's modern car and the oldest extant automobile known worldwide. Marcus' second car, built circa 1875 (a more specific date still being investigated by historians), is believed to be the first vehicle powered by a four-cycle engine and the first to use gasoline as a fuel, featuring the first carburetor for a gasoline engine and the first magneto ignition.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Siegfried Marcus CarEra_date_from: ca. 1875
Holt Caterpillar Tractor
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, RoadSub Category: Agricultural, Road TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 19181201 N Pershing AveStocktonState: CAZip: 95203Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/road-and-off-road-transportation/-60-holt-caterpillar-tractor-%281918%29Creator: Holt, Benjamin

The first practical demonstration of this tractor took place in a peat field on Roberts Island on November 24, 1904, and was patented and in production by December of 1907. The existing machine represents the earliest gasoline-powered track-type tractors that were to help revolutionize agriculture, logging, construction, road building, and transportation around the world. Its design and development is credited to Benjamin Holt (1849-1920), president of the Holt Manufacturing Company of Stockton.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Expired)Image Caption: The Holt 75 model gasoline-powered Caterpillar tractor used early in World War I as an artillery tractor. Later models were produced without the front "tiller wheel."Era_date_from: 1918
PACECO Container Crane
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Materials Handling & ExtractionEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1959Country: USAWebsite: http://www.pacecocorp.com/paceco_history.pdf, http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/materials-handling-and-excavation/-85-paceco-container-crane-%281959%29, https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/ResourceFiles/AboutASME/Who%20We%20Are/Engineering%20History/Landmarks/85-paceco-container-crane.pdfCreator: Ramsden, C. Dean, Pacific Coast Engineering Company

The world's first high-speed, dockside container-handling cranes reduced ship turnaround time from three weeks to eighteen hours. They became the model and set the standard for future designs worldwide. In service January 7, 1959, the A-frame cranes built at Encinal Terminals in Alameda, California, were designed to move large quantities of products with less handling, less damage, and less pilferage. Under the leadership of C. Dean Ramsden, P.E., the Pacific Coast Engineering Company (PACECO Inc.) met performance specifications developed by the Matson Navigation Company.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: PACECO Container CraneEra_date_from: 1959
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