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Agriculture

Rumely Companies' Agricultural Products
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 18531007 Lincolnway La PorteState: INCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-225-rumely-companies--agricultural-products-%281853, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/d44ed4fd-8920-4082-9a6a-b0a7a4f0c99a/225-Rumely-Companies-Agricultural-Products.aspxCreator: Rumely, Meinrad

Beginning with the blacksmith shop of German immigrant Meinrad Rumely (1823-1904), this successive family of firms invented and produced a line of agricultural equipment that played a vital role in the evolution of farming based on the muscle of humans and animals to one based on the power of the steam and ultimately the internal-combustion engine. The M. & J. Rumely Co. became the M. Rumely Co., and then the Advance Rumely Co. The Allis-Chalmers Company acquired the business in 1931.

Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/BulldozerD11 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Rumely Companies' Agricultural ProductsEra_date_from: 1853
Society: ASMEMain Category: CivilSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1903Charles CityState: IACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-190-hart-parr-tractor-%281903%29Creator: Hart, Charles Walter
This landmark artifact represents the first commercially successful farm tractor in the world powered by an internal-combustion engine. It was invented and built by Charles W. Hart and Charles H. Parr in Charles City, Iowa, as their Model 3, following two prototype versions.
YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Norbert Schnitzler (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Hart Parr TractorEra_date_from: 1903
Fresno Scraper
Society: ASMEMain Category: CivilSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1883FresnoState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-158-fresno-scraper-%281883%29Creator: Porteous, James

The Fresno scraper established the basis for the modern earthmoving scraper, being able to scrape and move a load of soil, then discharge it at a controlled depth. It quadrupled the productivity of manual labor, replacing hand shoveling of earth into horse carts.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Alisha Vargas (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Fresno ScraperEra_date_from: 1883
Cooper Steam Traction Engine Collection
Society: ASMEMain Category: CivilSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1860sKnox County Historical SocietyMount VernonState: OHZip: 43050Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-201-cooper-steam-traction-engine-collection-%28late, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/4071fc96-7a0c-4d14-8f4e-5d9371c259b2/201-Cooper-Steam-Traction-Engine.aspxCreator: Cooper & Co.

These engines, built by Cooper & Co., of Mount Vernon are among the oldest surviving agricultural steam engines to show the evolution from the portable, skid-mounted engine (ca. 1860) to the horse-drawn engine (1875), through the self-propelled but horse-guided engine (1875) and finally to the self-propelled, self-steered traction engine (1883). Such engines powered the conversion to mechanized farming, which was a great hallmark of the Industrial Revolution.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Cooper Self-Propelled, Self-Steering Traction EngineEra_date_from: 1860s
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