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Steam Engine

Corliss steam engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 19641300 Frenchtown RdEast GreenwichState: RIZip: 02818Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-164-new-england-wireless-and-steam-museum, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/311b4c58-18b4-4842-9f8b-18a866e6ad13/164-New-England-Wireless-and-Steam-Museum.aspxCreator: Merriam, Robert

Stationary steam engines, once the prime movers of industry, powered trains, ships, and mills in an age when there was no electric power. By the 19th century, American industry, especially in England, was rapidly outgrowing the capacity of the ater power that had been its principal prime mover. The need for a new power source inspired an intense development of the steam engine, the work of inventors directed mainly at imporving fuel efficiency by reducing steam consumption. The leader in this effort was George H.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/The-daffodil (CC BY-SA 4.0)Image Caption: Corliss steam engineEra_date_from: 1964
St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Line
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1830-1839DateCreated: 18352817 Canal Street
New OrleansState: LACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-101-st--charles-avenue-streetcar-line-%281835%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/40ef6e7c-697d-4f77-8daa-059a37f698b3/101-St-Charles-Avenue-Streetcar-Line-1835.aspxCreator: Perley A. Thomas Car Company

The St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Line is the oldest surviving interurban-urban passenger rail transportation system in the United States. Originally incorporated as the New Orleans Carrollton Rail Road in 1833, service began in 1835. A variety of motive power had been used including horses, mules, overhead cable, steam engines, and ammonia engines before electrification in 1893. The 900-series cars presently in service were designed and built by the Perley A. Thomas Car Company of High Point, North Carolina, in 1923 to 1924.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy Wikipedia/Falkue (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: St. Charles Avenue Streetcar LineEra_date_from: 1835
Reynolds-Corliss Pumping Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1917Main Street Pumping StationJacksonvilleState: FLZip: 32206Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-12-reynolds-corliss-pumping-engine-%281917%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/15c2d049-d9f4-4272-b2b1-620835320534/12_Reynolds_Corliss_Pumping_Engine.aspxCreator: Allis-Chalmers Company

Installed alongside an Epping Carpenter pump that was later scrapped, this water pump was built by Allis-Chalmers, which for many years had Edwin Reynolds as its chief engineer. Driven by a Corliss steam engine, these large city water pumps were installed in Jacksonville's water supply improvement program in 1915, and each pumped 5 million gallons of water a day until 1930 when the first of the electric-driven peripheral pumping stations began operating. Steam engine operation was discontinued in 1956.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Main Street Pumping Station - Jacksonville Water Department - 1917
Old Plant in Foreground - Landmark Reynolds-corliss Engine and
Allis Chalmers Pump Located in the Building in the Background.
View Looking North From Hogan's Creek
Era_date_from: 1917
Paddle Steamer Uri
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1901Lake Navigation CompanyLucerneCountry: SwitzerlandWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/water-transportation/-200-paddle-steamer-uri-%281901%29Creator: Sulzer brothers of Winterthur

This is the oldest operating vessel with a diagonal, compound steam engine, with disc valve gear. Operating at a higher pressure than the oscillating-cylinder engines then used in lake steamers, this type of engine was more powerful and efficient, as well as smaller. The compound engine, built by Sulzer brothers of Winterthur, uses super-heated steam from the boilers in two stages-high and low pressure-before exhausting it into a condenser. The engine produces 650 horsepower, turning two paddle wheels.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Coronado1992 (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Paddle Steamer UriEra_date_from: 1901
Hacienda La Esperanza Sugar Mill Steam Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1861Conservation Trust of Puerto RicoManatíState: PRZip: 00617Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-steam/-35-hacienda-la-esperanza-sugar-mill-steam-engine, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/60f1d4d5-215e-4334-8267-a40a7372288a/35_Hacienda_La_Esperanza_Sugar_Mill_Steam_Engine.aspxCreator: Watt, James , Newcomen, Thomas

The La Esperanza sugar mill steam engine is one of the few remaining American links to the pioneer beam engines of the English inventors Thomas Newcomen (1712) and James Watt (1769). The engine was built in 1861 in Cold Spring, New York, by the West Point Foundry. The general arrangement and details, including the Gothic embellishment, are typical of machinery of the period. The straight-line motion of the piston rod is accommodated to the arc of the moving beam end by a parallel motion. Watt regarded this ingenious linkage as the invention of which he was most proud.

YearAdded:
1979
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Hacienda La Esperanza Sugar Mill Steam EngineEra_date_from: 1861
Johnstown Incline
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1891601-799 Edgehill DrJohnstownState: PAZip: 15905Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-180-johnstown-incline-%281891%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/619cfbc4-d1bb-4a41-bf69-3edae36a39fe/180-Johnstown-Incline-1891.aspxCreator: Diescher, Samuel

This is one of several, similar inclines built in western Pennsylvania during the late 19th century. It was designed by Samuel Diescher (1839-1915) after the great flood of 1889, to provide an efficient means of transportation between Westmont and the Conemaugh Valley. (See also the Monogahela and Duquesne Inclines in Pittsburgh.)

YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeremy Tenenbaum (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Johnstown InclineEra_date_from: 1891
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895665 Marietta StreetAtlantaState: GAZip: 30313Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-steam/-110-harris-corliss-steam-engine-%281895%29Creator: William Harris steam engine company
This 350-horsepower Corliss type steam engine is an example of a typical late nineteenth century steam engine. The essential feature of Corliss type engines is the valves that admit steam to and exhaust it from the cylinder. The Corliss valve gear made the engine extremely efficient in steam consumption and was the most efficient system for controlling low to medium speed engines. This particular engine operated for more than eighty years, having been retired not by age but over concern for stack emissions by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The engine was built by the William A.
YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Harris-Corliss Steam EngineEra_date_from: 1895
Cooper Steam Traction Engine Collection
Society: ASMEMain Category: CivilSub Category: AgricultureEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1860sKnox County Historical SocietyMount VernonState: OHZip: 43050Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/agriculture/-201-cooper-steam-traction-engine-collection-%28late, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/4071fc96-7a0c-4d14-8f4e-5d9371c259b2/201-Cooper-Steam-Traction-Engine.aspxCreator: Cooper & Co.

These engines, built by Cooper & Co., of Mount Vernon are among the oldest surviving agricultural steam engines to show the evolution from the portable, skid-mounted engine (ca. 1860) to the horse-drawn engine (1875), through the self-propelled but horse-guided engine (1875) and finally to the self-propelled, self-steered traction engine (1883). Such engines powered the conversion to mechanized farming, which was a great hallmark of the Industrial Revolution.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Cooper Self-Propelled, Self-Steering Traction EngineEra_date_from: 1860s
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