Skip to main content

GA

Cotton Gin
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: ProcessingEra: 1750-1799DateCreated: 1794Cotton Exchange Commission BuildingSavannahState: GACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/cotton-gin-20.aspxCreator: Eli Whitney

This Creative Development Which Was Responsible For The Survival Of The Cotton Industry In The United States Occurred In General Nathaniel Greene's Plantation Near Savannah 10 Miles Northeast Of This Marker. Separation By Hand Labor Of The Lint From The Seed Of The Desired Upland Variety Of Cotton Produced Only One Pound Per Day Per Person. Eli Whitney, A Native Of Massachusetts And Yale Law Graduate, Came To Georgia To Teach School In Late 1792, At Age 27. Mrs. Catherine Greene, Widow Of General Greene, Invited Whitney To Her Plantation, And Urged Him To Design A Cotton Gin.

YearAdded:
1986
Charles Herty
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Industrial AdvancesEra: 1930sDateCreated: 1932Herty Advanced Materials Development CenterSavannahState: GACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/savannahpaper.htmlCreator: Herty, Charles Holmes

When Georgia chemist Charles Holmes Herty found a way to make quality paper from pine trees in 1932, he also founded an industry that brought much-needed jobs to the depression-crippled south. Paper producers had deemed the plentiful pine too gummy—until Herty's Savannah Pulp and Paper Laboratory wrote a new chapter in the ancient craft inspired by insects who built paper nests while dinosaurs roamed the earth. At its root, however, the papermaking process remained the same: the bonding of cellulose, a polymer whose long chains support plant cell walls.

YearAdded:
2001
Image Credit: Courtesy U.S. Library of Congress. Image Caption: Portrait of Charles Holmes Herty in 1925.
City Plan of Savannah
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Civil Engineering ProfessionEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1733Historic DistrictSavannahState: GAZip: 31401Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/city-plan-of-savannah/Creator: Oglethorpe, James

The Savannah city plan, whose execution began in 1733, is distinguished from those of previous colonial towns by the repeated pattern of connected neighborhoods, multiple squares, streets, and designed expansion into lands held by the city. It is unique in the history of urban planning in a number of aspects, not the least of which is that the squares allow for more open space in Savannah than any city layout in history. 

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/PurpleChezImage Caption: City Plan of SavannahEra_date_from: 1733
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895665 Marietta StreetAtlantaState: GAZip: 30313Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-steam/-110-harris-corliss-steam-engine-%281895%29Creator: William Harris steam engine company
This 350-horsepower Corliss type steam engine is an example of a typical late nineteenth century steam engine. The essential feature of Corliss type engines is the valves that admit steam to and exhaust it from the cylinder. The Corliss valve gear made the engine extremely efficient in steam consumption and was the most efficient system for controlling low to medium speed engines. This particular engine operated for more than eighty years, having been retired not by age but over concern for stack emissions by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The engine was built by the William A.
YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Harris-Corliss Steam EngineEra_date_from: 1895
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: EducationEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaState: GAZip: 30332Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/education/-213-george-w--woodruff-school-of-mechanical-enginCreator: Coon, John Saylor
Between its opening in 1888 and the mid-1920s, Georgia Tech took a leading role in transforming mechanical engineering education from a shop-based, vocational program to a professional one built on rigorous academic and analytical methods. Led by John Saylor Coon (1854-1938), a founding member of ASME, this curriculum merged theoretical understanding with practical experience. By bringing Coon on board so soon after the school's founding, Tech began this transition almost from day one, even though it took three decades to completely effect it.
YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Expired)Image Caption: On Left: Georgia Tech's shop building
On Right: Tech Tower
Photo circa 1899
Era_date_from: 1888
Fly Delta
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: AviationEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1941-1947Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL)AtlantaState: GACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/uploadedFiles/About_AIAA/News_Room/DeltaAirLinesHistoricBuildingsPR.pdfCreator: Sims, Walter

Delta Air Lines’ historic buildings consist of two aircraft hangers and several office buildings at the Delta World Headquarters site constructed between 1941 and 1947. On March 1, 1941, Delta Air Lines moved its corporate headquarters to Atlanta, constructing offices space and Hangar 1, the largest aircraft hangar in the Southeast United States at what was then Atlanta Municipal Airport. The airport was later renamed Hartsfield – Jackson International Airport in honor of Atlanta Mayors William B. Hartsfield and Maynard H. Jackson Jr.

YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Mav (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: "Fly Delta Air Lines" markerEra_date_from: 1941
Subscribe to GA

We hope you enjoyed this essay.

Please support this 70-year tradition of trusted historical writing and the volunteers that sustain it with a donation to American Heritage.

Donate

Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.