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1895

Manufacturer’s identification plaque
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Reed Gold Mine Historic SiteMidlandState: NCZip: 28107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/minerals-extraction-and-refining/-84-reed-gold-mine-ten-stamp-mill-%281895%29Creator: Mecklenburg Iron Works

The first authenticated discovery of gold in the U.S. occurred on the Cabarrus County farm of John Reed in 1799, sparking the nation's first gold rush. During its peak years, more than a million dollars of gold was recovered a year, making North Carolina a leader in gold production until 1848. This mill, built by the Mecklenburg Iron Works of Charlotte, North Carolina, is original except for the timber work. Two groups of five 750-pound stamps with 5- to 7-inch lift, rose and fell thirty-five times a minute to yield a finely crushed ore.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Caption: Manufacturer’s identification plaqueEra_date_from: 1895
Reed Gold Mine Ten-Stamp Mill
Society: SME (mining)Main Category: MiningSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Reed Gold Mine Historic SiteMidlandState: NCZip: 28107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.smenet.org/Creator: Mecklenburg Iron Works

The first authenticated discovery of gold in the U.S. occurred on the Cabarrus County farm of John Reed in 1799, sparking the nation's first gold rush. During its peak years, more than a million dollars of gold was recovered a year, making North Carolina a leader in gold production until 1848. This mill, built by the Mecklenburg Iron Works of Charlotte, North Carolina, is original except for the timber work. Two groups of five 750-pound stamps with 5- to 7-inch lift, rose and fell thirty-five times a minute to yield a finely crushed ore.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Photo Courtesy of North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.Image Caption: The Stamp Mill at the Reed Gold Mine in Midland, NC.Era_date_from: 1895
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: Power, Energy & Industry ApplicationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 18951501 Buffalo AvenueNiagara FallsState: NYZip: 14303Country: USAWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Adams_Hydroelectric_Generating_Plant,_1895Creator: McKim Mead & White
When the Adams Plant went into operation on August 26, 1895, it represented a key victory for alternating-current systems over direct-current. The clear advantage of high voltage AC for long distance power transmission and the unprecedented size of the plant (it reached its full capacity of ten 5,000-HP generators in May 1900) influenced the future of the electrical industry worldwide. In August 1895 the Adams No. 1 generating station of the Niagara Falls Power Company first supplied electric power to local industries in Niagara Falls, New York.
YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Lvklock (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Adams Hydroelectric Generating PlantEra_date_from: 1895
Lookout Mountain Incline Railway
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Rail TransportationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Lookout MountainChattanoogaState: TNZip: 37350Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/rail-transportation---2/-156-lookout-mountain-incline-railway-%281895%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/769218e7-8ab4-486a-8de5-f5e7a4299859/156-Lookout-Mountain-Incline-Railway-1895.aspxCreator: Crass, John , Lookout Mountain Incline Railway Company

At the mountain where the Civil War's Battle Above the Clouds was waged, tourist business has thrived from the building of its first toll road (Whiteside Pike) in 1857 to present day.

YearAdded:
1991
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Duane Tate (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Lookout Mountain Incline RailwayEra_date_from: 1895
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895665 Marietta StreetAtlantaState: GAZip: 30313Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-steam/-110-harris-corliss-steam-engine-%281895%29Creator: William Harris steam engine company
This 350-horsepower Corliss type steam engine is an example of a typical late nineteenth century steam engine. The essential feature of Corliss type engines is the valves that admit steam to and exhaust it from the cylinder. The Corliss valve gear made the engine extremely efficient in steam consumption and was the most efficient system for controlling low to medium speed engines. This particular engine operated for more than eighty years, having been retired not by age but over concern for stack emissions by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The engine was built by the William A.
YearAdded:
1985
Image Credit: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Harris-Corliss Steam EngineEra_date_from: 1895
Folsom Powerhouse on the American River, at Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, California, USA
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895American RiverFolsomState: CAZip: 95630Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/19-folsom-power-house-1Creator: Knight, H.T., Sacramento Electric Power & Light Co

The historic Folsom Power House #1 marks one of the first successful uses of hydroelectric power in the world and the first successful transmission of power long distance (twenty-two miles to Sacramento). The old Folsom Power House still shelters the machinery generated to drive streetcars and illuminate the city of Sacramento.

Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Folsom Powerhouse on the American River, at Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, California, USAEra_date_from: 1895
Folsom Hydroelectric Power System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895American RiverFolsomState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Folsom-Hydroelectric-Power-System/Creator: Knight, H.T., Sacramento Electric Power & Light Co

"The State [of California] agreed to construct the dam using convict labor for which consideration the State received a grant of land for the construction of a prison and water power rights from the impounded water ...; The work progressed slowly during the dry season by disinterested convict labor using hand tools since the use of machinery was forbidden ...;"  
- Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1974

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Folsom Hydroelectric Power SystemEra_date_from: 1895
Morley with students and instructors, ca. 1893.
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeDateCreated: 1895Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandState: OHZip: 44106Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/atomicweightofoxygen.htmlCreator: Morley, Edward W.

In his laboratory at Western Reserve University (Now Case Western Reserve University), Edward W. Morley carried out his research on the atomic weight of oxygen that provided a new standard to the science of chemistry. The accuracy of his analyses has never been superseded by chemical means. His great work, published in 1895, also gave important insight into the atomic theory of matter.

He observed, after carefully analysis of the volume proportions in which hydrogen and oxygen unite, that the atomic weight of oxygen was 15.879.

The plaque commemorating the event reads:

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy ACSImage Caption: Morley with students and instructors, ca. 1893.
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