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Power Generation

Snoqualmie Falls Cavity Generating Station
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1899Base of FallsSnoqualmieState: WAZip: 98024Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Snoqualmie-Falls-Cavity-Generating-Station/Creator: Baker, William

This was one of the first power facilities to demonstrate the feasibility of long distance electric power transmission. Through an elaborate switchboard at the main station, tied to similar boards at substations, a complete circuit was created to drive an electric motor 153 miles from the generator a remarkable distance at that time.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Allen Sheffield (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Snoqualmie FallsEra_date_from: 1899
Gravimetric Coal Feeder
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1957Stock Equipment PlantChagrin FallsState: OHCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---2/-184-gravimetric-coal-feeder-%281957%29Creator: Stock, Arthur, Hardgrove, Ralph

A variety of mechanical feeders, including drag-chain conveyors and rotary pocket feeders, historically have been used to volumetrically control the flow of fuel to coal pulverizers on power generators. Most power generation in the United States has relied on burning fossil fuels in steam boilers, with coal as the fuel of choice. By the 1920s, pulverized-firing (the burning in suspension of finely ground coal particles) evolved as means to more complete fuel combustion and higher system efficiencies and facilitated the use of larger boilers.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Caption: Drawing from patent documents for Gravimetric Coal Feeder.Era_date_from: 1957
Folsom Powerhouse on the American River, at Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, California, USA
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895American RiverFolsomState: CAZip: 95630Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/19-folsom-power-house-1Creator: Knight, H.T., Sacramento Electric Power & Light Co

The historic Folsom Power House #1 marks one of the first successful uses of hydroelectric power in the world and the first successful transmission of power long distance (twenty-two miles to Sacramento). The old Folsom Power House still shelters the machinery generated to drive streetcars and illuminate the city of Sacramento.

Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Folsom Powerhouse on the American River, at Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, California, USAEra_date_from: 1895
Folsom Hydroelectric Power System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Power GenerationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895American RiverFolsomState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Folsom-Hydroelectric-Power-System/Creator: Knight, H.T., Sacramento Electric Power & Light Co

"The State [of California] agreed to construct the dam using convict labor for which consideration the State received a grant of land for the construction of a prison and water power rights from the impounded water ...; The work progressed slowly during the dry season by disinterested convict labor using hand tools since the use of machinery was forbidden ...;"  
- Historic Landmark Nomination Form, 1974

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Folsom Hydroelectric Power SystemEra_date_from: 1895
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, ElectricSub Category: WaterEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909PhoenixState: AZCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-13-childs-irving-hydroelectric-project-%281909%29Creator: Turner, Lew
Fossil Creek meanders ten miles to the Verde River, dropping some 1,600 feet during its course and, at the turn of the century, enticed miners in the copper-rich Irving area to use a new technology -- hydroelectric power. A seven-mile series of flumes brings the water from a dam below Fossil Spring to the Irving Plant and then to Stehr Lake.
YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Original Image: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Childs-Irving Hydroelectric ProjectEra_date_from: 1909
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