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Hydraulics Laboratory at the University of Iowa
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: WaterEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1919Iowa CityState: IAZip: 52240Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Hydraulics-Laboratory-at-the-University-of-Iowa/Creator: University of Iowa

The Hydraulics Laboratory at The University of Iowa, renovated in 2001 and in 2003 renamed the C. Maxwell Stanley Hydraulics Laboratory, is the oldest university-based hydraulics laboratory in the U.S. that continuously has focused on research, education, and service in hydraulic engineering. Since its initial construction in 1919, the facility and staff have produced a massive amount of research that has shaped water-related constructs around the world. Its efforts have been guided by noted directors such as Floyd Nagler (1920-1933), Hunter Rouse (1944-1965), and John F.

Image Credit: Courtesy University of Iowa LibrariesImage Caption: Man sits across river from Hydraulic Laboratory, the University of Iowa, circa 1933Era_date_from: 1919
Morris Canal Reaction Turbine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1850Morris CanalGreenwich TownshipState: NJZip: 07840Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-water/-38-morris-canal-%28reaction%29-turbine-%281850%29-Creator: Renwick, James

This reaction or "Scotch" turbine had as its antecedent the steam reaction wheel invented in Greek Alexandra by Hero around 100 B.C.. It found widespread hydraulic application in the United States from the beginning of the nineteenth century to mid-century when French-inspired hydraulic turbine design pushed reaction wheels into obsolence.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Morris Canal Reaction TurbineEra_date_from: 1850
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, ElectricSub Category: WaterEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929Metropolitan Edison Power Co.MuhlenbergState: PAZip: 19605Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-57-kaplan-turbine-%281929%29Creator: Kaplan, Viktor
This Kaplan turbine is one of the first three machines to be put into service in the United States. Named for its Austrian inventor, Viktor Kaplan (1876-1934), the turbine was an outstanding innovation, operating with a high, nearly constant efficiency over a wide load range. The machine was built by S. Morgan Smith Company of York, Pennsylvania.
YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Arm0Image Caption: Kaplan TurbineEra_date_from: 1929
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1859 Heritage State ParkHolyokeState: MAZip: 01040Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-water/-129-holyoke-water-power-system-%281859%29Creator: Holyoke Water Power Company, Herschel, Clemens
Known as the Paper City by 1877, this site was a major industrial center with extensive paper mills, textile mills, machine shops, and a water power system that had within a few decades transformed the fields of Ireland Parish into the manufacturing city of Holyoke. A group of Boston investors created the system of dams, canals, mills, streets, and boarding houses, which was incorporated as Holyoke in 1850. Built between 1847 and 1892 according to the original plan, the dam and canals provided work for Irish immigrants and the French Canadians, Germans, and other nationalities.
YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain (Produced Prior to 1/1/1923)Image Caption: Panoramic of the Holyoke Mills (The American Thread Company) on Holyoke Canal, 1909Era_date_from: 1859
Folsom Powerhouse on the American River, at Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, California, USA
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895American RiverFolsomState: CAZip: 95630Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/19-folsom-power-house-1Creator: Knight, H.T., Sacramento Electric Power & Light Co

The historic Folsom Power House #1 marks one of the first successful uses of hydroelectric power in the world and the first successful transmission of power long distance (twenty-two miles to Sacramento). The old Folsom Power House still shelters the machinery generated to drive streetcars and illuminate the city of Sacramento.

Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Folsom Powerhouse on the American River, at Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, California, USAEra_date_from: 1895
Society: ASMEMain Category: Mechanical, ElectricSub Category: WaterEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1909PhoenixState: AZCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-13-childs-irving-hydroelectric-project-%281909%29Creator: Turner, Lew
Fossil Creek meanders ten miles to the Verde River, dropping some 1,600 feet during its course and, at the turn of the century, enticed miners in the copper-rich Irving area to use a new technology -- hydroelectric power. A seven-mile series of flumes brings the water from a dam below Fossil Spring to the Irving Plant and then to Stehr Lake.
YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Original Image: Public Domain (National Park Service)Image Caption: Childs-Irving Hydroelectric ProjectEra_date_from: 1909
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1871Harmony Mill No. 3CohoesState: NYZip: 12047Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-water/-5-boyden-hydraulic-turbines-%281871%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5507.pdfCreator: Boyden, Uriah Atherton
These two water turbines were probably the largest and nearly the most powerful ever built in the United States, supplying direct mechanical power to a manufacturing plant. Their installation between 1871 and 1873 makes them among the oldest surviving water turbines. A dam at Cohoes diverted water to mills and factories along a power canal system. The vertical-shaft turbines at the mill were said to run at 800 horsepower (600 kilowatt) under a head of 20 feet and were connected to an overhead shaft by bevel gearing.
YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: An 1879 sketch of the Boyden Hydraulic Turbine, drawn by James Emerson for his book "Treatise relative to the testing of water-wheels and machinery"Era_date_from: 1871
Hiwassee Dam Unit 2 Reversible Pump-Turbine 1
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1956MurphyState: NCZip: 28906Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-67-hiwassee-dam-unit-2-reversible-pump-turbine-%281, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/4a637087-db16-4eb1-8240-e2a1a40e9d8c/67-Hiwassee-Dam.aspxCreator: Allis-Chalmers Company

The integration of pump and turbine was the first of many to be installed in power-plant systems in the United States. It was the largest and most powerful in the world. As a "pump storage" unit in the Tennessee Valley Authority's system, it effected significant economies in the generation of electrical energy. The unit was designed by engineers of the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Allis-Chalmers Company. It was built by Allis-Chalmers.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Tennessee Valley Authority)Image Caption: Hiwassee Dam Unit 2 Reversible Pump-Turbine 1Era_date_from: 1956
Rocky River Pumped-storage Hydroelectric Plant
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1929Rocky River StationHartfordState: CTZip: 06101Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-56-rocky-river-pumped-storage-hydroelectric-plant, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/1b393410-996b-4172-b5b7-628efc383e7d/56-Rocky-River-Hydroelectric-Station.aspxCreator: Connecticut Light & Power Company

The Connecticut Light & Power Company pioneered the use of pumped storage in the United States at this hydroelectric station. First operated in 1929, the Rocky River Plant had two reversible pumps that somewhat resemble large hydroelectric turbines. This permitted significant improvements in the system efficiency of the company's network of hydroelectric and thermal-electric power generating plants. Water is pumped uphill through a penstock and stored in Lake Candlewood.

YearAdded:
1980
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Rocky River Pumped-storage Hydroelectric PlantEra_date_from: 1929
Michigan-Lake Superior Power Hydroelectric Plant
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1902Michigan-Lake Superior Power Hydroelectric PlantSaulte Sainte MarieState: MICountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-61-michigan-lake-superior-power-hydroelectric-pla, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/9a6fbefb-8d74-4a9d-aaec-f5838421d7e4/61-Michigan-Lake-Superior-Plant.aspxCreator: Clergue, Francis, von Schon, Hans A.E.

This low-head operating plant is representative of nineteenth-century hydropower-plant practice using many small turbines in contrast to twentieth-century use of few large turbines and generators. Its 40,000 horsepower capacity made it the largest in the country using turbines of American design (McCormick-Francis). The contemporary and larger Niagara installation used turbines of French design (Fourneyron). The entrepreneur of this plant was Francis Clergue, a lawyer, who employed as his chief engineer Hans A.E. von Schon, a German immigrant who had served with the U.S.

YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Michigan-Lake Superior Power Hydroelectric PlantEra_date_from: 1902
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