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Hydraulic

Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1871Harmony Mill No. 3CohoesState: NYZip: 12047Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-water/-5-boyden-hydraulic-turbines-%281871%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5507.pdfCreator: Boyden, Uriah Atherton
These two water turbines were probably the largest and nearly the most powerful ever built in the United States, supplying direct mechanical power to a manufacturing plant. Their installation between 1871 and 1873 makes them among the oldest surviving water turbines. A dam at Cohoes diverted water to mills and factories along a power canal system. The vertical-shaft turbines at the mill were said to run at 800 horsepower (600 kilowatt) under a head of 20 feet and were connected to an overhead shaft by bevel gearing.
YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: An 1879 sketch of the Boyden Hydraulic Turbine, drawn by James Emerson for his book "Treatise relative to the testing of water-wheels and machinery"Era_date_from: 1871
Acueducto de Queretaro
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1700-1749DateCreated: 1726 - 1738De Los Arcos 171Santiago de QuerétaroState: QuerétaroZip: 76020Country: MexicoWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acueduto-de-queretaro/Creator: de Urrutia y Arana, Juan Antonio

Queretaro's aqueduct, in Central Mexico, is one of the most eloquent symbols of colonial Mexico. As one of the early major hydraulic engineering projects in North America, it defines the city both nationally and internationally. The aqueduct, designed in 1723 by Juan Antonio de Urrutia y Arana, Marquis of Villa del Villar del Aquila, was inspired by the aqueducts of Segovia, Merida and Tarragona in Spain. It began supplying clean water to the city in this arid region of Mexico on October 17, 1738.

YearAdded:
1995
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Ephobius (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Acueducto de QueretaroEra_date_from: 1726
Wyman-Gordon 50,000-ton Hydraulic Forging Press
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1950-1959DateCreated: 1954Wyman-Gordon CompanyWorcesterState: MAZip: 01615Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/manufacturing---1/89-wyman-gordon-50-000-ton-hydraulic-forging-pres, https://www.asme.org/wwwasmeorg/media/ResourceFiles/AboutASME/Who%20We%20Are/Engineering%20History/Landmarks/89-wyman-gordon-50000-ton-hydraulic-forging-press.pdf

This hydraulic closed-die press, among the largest fabrication tools in the world, has had a profound influence in America's leading role in commercial aircraft, military aircraft, and space technology. As part of the same Heavy Press Program that created the Mesta press, the Wyman-Gordon press was designed by the Loewy Construction Company and began operating in October 1955. Among its contributions was the development of the new jetliner Boeing 747 in the 1960s.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Wyman-Gordon 50,000-ton Hydraulic Forging PressEra_date_from: 1954
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