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1871

Kamehameha V Post Office
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BuildingsEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1871corner of Merchant and Bethel StreetsHonoluluState: HIZip: 96813Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/People-and-Projects/Projects/Landmarks/Kamehameha-V-Post-Office/Creator: Osborn, J.G.

The Kamehameha V Post Office is the oldest surviving public building in the U.S.  constructed with reinforced concrete. The success of this early structure helped establish the value of reinforced concrete as a durable construction material.

Brickmaker J.G. Osborne was chosen to provide design and construction. He  immigrated to Hawaii from Yorkshire, England, and was aware of the recent  development of Portland cement and its expanding use in Europe. It is believed that the leaders of Hawaii were anxious to adopt British skills, which influenced their selection of Osborne.

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Public Domain (Author's Choice)Image Caption: Kamehameha V Post OfficeEra_date_from: 1871
Druid Lake Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1871Druid Hill ParkBaltimoreState: MDCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Druid-Lake-Dam/Creator: Martin, Robert

Like other American cities in the late 19th century, Baltimore had grown so quickly its supply system was unable to provide city residents with a dependable supply of water. Two reservoirs built outside the city helped increase capacity, but heavy rainfalls in the largely agricultural area tended to foul this additional water supply. City officials elected to construct a holding reservoir within the city - contained by an earthen dam - where silty water would be allowed to settle. No such project had ever been undertaken in the United States.

YearAdded:
1971
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeff Covey (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Druid Lake DamEra_date_from: 1871
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1871Harmony Mill No. 3CohoesState: NYZip: 12047Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/mechanical-power-production-water/-5-boyden-hydraulic-turbines-%281871%29, http://files.asme.org/ASMEORG/Communities/History/Landmarks/5507.pdfCreator: Boyden, Uriah Atherton
These two water turbines were probably the largest and nearly the most powerful ever built in the United States, supplying direct mechanical power to a manufacturing plant. Their installation between 1871 and 1873 makes them among the oldest surviving water turbines. A dam at Cohoes diverted water to mills and factories along a power canal system. The vertical-shaft turbines at the mill were said to run at 800 horsepower (600 kilowatt) under a head of 20 feet and were connected to an overhead shaft by bevel gearing.
YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: An 1879 sketch of the Boyden Hydraulic Turbine, drawn by James Emerson for his book "Treatise relative to the testing of water-wheels and machinery"Era_date_from: 1871
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