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Dams

The Dalles Lock and Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1950sDateCreated: 1956The Dalles Dam Visitor CenterThe DallesState: ORWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/the-dalles-lock-and-dam/

The Dalles Lock and Dam was one of the largest, most complete, and complex multipurpose projects of its kind in the United States at the time of its construction. It provided an example for future projects benefitting navigation, recreation, water for irrigation and hydropower, fish migration, and flood mitigation. The unusual "L" configuration of the project enabled reduced construction dewatering and created a permanent shallow stilling basin that aids fish passage.

Image Credit: Courtesy US Army Corps of EngineersImage Caption: The Dalles Lock and Dam
Zuiderzee Enclosure Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1927-1932ZuiderzeeZaandamState: North HollandCountry: NetherlandsWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Zuiderzee-Enclosure-DamCreator: Lely, Cornelis

The first Zuiderzee Enclosure Dam ran from North Holland to the island of Wieringen, successfully barring the sea for over 50 years and protecting a large area north of Amsterdam. The total Zuiderzee project was the largest land reclamation effort in the Netherlands, developed over a period of about 80 years, beginning in 1918 and reaching completion in 1996. The huge dyke/dam was considered one of the greatest engineering feats of its time.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Public Domain (Copyright Exp.)Image Caption: Zuiderzee Enclosure DamEra_date_from: 1927
Woodhead Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1897Woodhead DamCape TownState: Western CapeCountry: South AfricaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Woodhead-Dam/Creator: Stewart, Thomas

With the discoveries of South Africa's diamonds in the 1860s and gold in the 1880s, immigrants flooded into Cape Town and changed it into a major commercial center. Unfortunately, its water supply had not kept pace with the population growth.  After several droughts and years of inadequate water supply, the Woodhead Tunnel was constructed between 1887 and 1891. When it failed to solve the water shortage problem, the Municipality of Cape Town determined that a dam and reservoir needed to be built.

YearAdded:
2008
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Tim Fields (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Woodhead DamEra_date_from: 1897
Kentucky Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1944Tennessee RiverGrand RiverState: KYZip: 42045Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Kentucky-Dam/Creator: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

In 1930, the U.S. Corps of Engineers was directed to complete an engineering survey of the Tennessee River to determine the feasibility of establishing complete river navigability. The resulting report recommended a series of nine main river dams and several tributary dams to allow for a minimum eight foot channel (standard for barge navigation) from Knoxville to Paducah.

YearAdded:
1996
Image Credit: Courtesy of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Kentucky DamEra_date_from: 1944
Norris Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1936Norris DamKnoxvilleState: TNZip: 37705Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Norris-Dam/Creator: Wank, Roland

Norris Dam impounds the Clinch River, a mountain tributary of the Tennessee River. The facility stands as a tribute and symbol of the birth of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Given broad jurisdiction over resource development in the watershed (a 40,000-square-mile basin comprising parts of Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, and Tennessee), the TVA was formed to plan for flood control, improve navigation, and produce hydroelectric power.

YearAdded:
1986
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/vosburg09 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Norris DamEra_date_from: 1936
Sweetwater Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1880-1889DateCreated: 1888Sweetwater RiverChula VistaState: CACountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Sweetwater-Dam/Creator: Brown, Frank , Schuyler, James

When completed in 1888 to a height of 90 feet, Sweetwater Dam was once the tallest masonry arch dam in the United States, and it led to many others of the same basic design. The original construction began in November 1886 under the direction of Frank E. Brown (civil engineer for Bear Valley Dam) with the rubble-masonry thin-arch design being 50 feet in height. Subsequently, the owner of the water system called upon civil engineer James D. Schuyler to continue and complete the project. Although the field of hydrology was very new and not fully understood at the time, Mr.

YearAdded:
2005
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Phil Konstantin (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Sweetwater DamEra_date_from: 1888
Hoover Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1930-1939DateCreated: 1935Colorado RiverBoulder CityState: AZZip: 86443Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Hoover-Dam/Creator: Six Companies, Inc., Davis, Arthur

In 1918, the U.S. Reclamation Service's director and chief engineer Arthur P. Davis proposed a dam of unprecedented height to control the devastating floods on the Colorado River, generate hydroelectric power, and store the river's ample waters for irrigation and other uses.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy of Flickr/JoshBerglund19 (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Hoover DamEra_date_from: 1935
Grand Coulee Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1941Columbia RiverGrand CouleeState: WAZip: 99133Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Grand-Coulee-Dam/Creator: Bureau of Reclamation

The massive Grand Coulee Dam, on the Columbia River, is the largest concrete structure in the U.S., the largest hydroelectric facility in the U.S., and the sixth-largest hydroelectric facility in the world. It provides irrigation for up to 1.1 million acres of agricultural lands and the hydroelectric complex maintains a generating capacity of 6.8 million kilowatts. It also serves as the primary flood control for the Columbia River basin (with a capacity of 5.18 million acre-feet of water) and provides recreational opportunities on the 150-mile-long Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr; //lucylu (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Grand Coulee DamEra_date_from: 1941
Fort Peck Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1940Missouri RiverFort PeckState: MTZip: 59248Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Fort-Peck-Dam/Creator: Works Progress Administration

The Fort Peck Dam was a cornerstone project of the Works Progress Administration of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. It required the largest construction plant and workforce since the construction of the Panama Canal and peaked at 11,000 workers. It was the largest dam of any type in the world for over 30 years.

YearAdded:
1990
Image Credit: Courtesy U.S. Army Corps of EngineersImage Caption: Fort Peck DamEra_date_from: 1940
Elephant Butte Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1916Rio Grande RiverTruth or ConsequencesState: NMZip: 87901Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Elephant-Butte-Dam/Creator: Hill, Louis

One of the first major efforts to increase farming and encourage habitation in the arid regions of the western United States, the Rio Grande Project was designed to provide reliable irrigation as well as resolve a dispute over water supply with the Republic of Mexico.  The project's centerpiece is Elephant Butte Dam, a concrete gravity structure 301 feet high and 1,674 feet wide. Elephant Butte Reservoir - with a surface area of 36,600 acres and a capacity of more than 2.2 million acre-feet - was the largest reservoir in the world at the time of its completion.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Bureau of Reclamation)Image Caption: Elephant Butte Dam, 2016 (day before centenial celebration)Era_date_from: 1916
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