Skip to main content

Flood Control

Guayabo Ceremonial Center
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Civil Engineering ProfessionEra: BCDateCreated: 300 BC - 1400 ADTurrialbaState: TurrialbaCountry: Costa RicaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Guayabo-Ceremonial-Center/Creator: Early Costa Rico natives

The early people of Costa Rica in the present-day area of Turrialba in Cartago Province built this ceremonial center with care and precision, and it is the country's primary and most important archaeological site. The Guayabo National Monument is of international significance because of its extensive roadways, retaining walls, underground channels, water supply, and flood control and drainage facilities that represent early civil engineering achievements by pre-Columbian people.

YearAdded:
2009
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Steve L. Martin (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Guayabo Ceremonial CenterEra_date_from: 300 BC
Grand Coulee Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1941Columbia RiverGrand CouleeState: WAZip: 99133Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Grand-Coulee-Dam/Creator: Bureau of Reclamation

The massive Grand Coulee Dam, on the Columbia River, is the largest concrete structure in the U.S., the largest hydroelectric facility in the U.S., and the sixth-largest hydroelectric facility in the world. It provides irrigation for up to 1.1 million acres of agricultural lands and the hydroelectric complex maintains a generating capacity of 6.8 million kilowatts. It also serves as the primary flood control for the Columbia River basin (with a capacity of 5.18 million acre-feet of water) and provides recreational opportunities on the 150-mile-long Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr; //lucylu (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Grand Coulee DamEra_date_from: 1941
Miami Conservancy District
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1922Taylorsville Dam (One of 5 Dams)Huber HeightsState: OHZip: 45424Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Miami-Conservancy-District/Creator: Flood Prevention Committee, Morgan, Arthur Ernest

The Miami Conservancy District flood control project was the direct result of the disastrous flood of 1913, when waters from the Miami, Stillwater, and Mad rivers flooded Dayton and surrounding communities in the Miami Valley. More than 400 lives were lost and property damage exceeded $100 million. When Dayton flooded, great fires raged, adding to the devastation. Many believed that the area would never recover. 

YearAdded:
1972
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/bobosh_t (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: The Taylorsville Dam, one of the five dry damns to come out of the Miami Conservancy DistrictEra_date_from: 1922
Subscribe to Flood Control

We hope you enjoyed this essay.

Please support this 70-year tradition of trusted historical writing and the volunteers that sustain it with a donation to American Heritage.

Donate

Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.