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Reservoir

Elephant Butte Dam
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: DamsEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1916Rio Grande RiverTruth or ConsequencesState: NMZip: 87901Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Elephant-Butte-Dam/Creator: Hill, Louis

One of the first major efforts to increase farming and encourage habitation in the arid regions of the western United States, the Rio Grande Project was designed to provide reliable irrigation as well as resolve a dispute over water supply with the Republic of Mexico.  The project's centerpiece is Elephant Butte Dam, a concrete gravity structure 301 feet high and 1,674 feet wide. Elephant Butte Reservoir - with a surface area of 36,600 acres and a capacity of more than 2.2 million acre-feet - was the largest reservoir in the world at the time of its completion.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Bureau of Reclamation)Image Caption: Elephant Butte Dam, 2016 (day before centenial celebration)Era_date_from: 1916
Marlette Lake Water System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1873-1887Lake Tahoe–Nevada State ParkCarson CityState: NVZip: 89703Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Marlette-Lake-Water-System/Creator: Schussler, Hermann

In the mid-1800s Virginia City was America's greatest producer of high-grade silver and gold ore. When mining activities began, natural springs provided water to the camps. As the population grew, the Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company was formed to address the need for more water. The company first drew water from tunnels that had been driven into the mountains by prospectors. Water was stored in wooden tanks and sent through pipes into the town. 

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeff Moser (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Marlette Lake Water SystemEra_date_from: 1873
Prehistoric Mesa Verde Reservoirs
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 0-1000DateCreated: 750-1180Mesa Verde National ParkMontezuma CountyState: COZip: 81330Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Prehistoric-Mesa-Verde-Reservoirs/Creator: Ancient Pueblo Peoples

Four prehistoric reservoirs at Mesa Verde National Park were constructed and used between AD 750 and AD 1180. They are: Morefield Reservoir (in Morefield Canyon), Far View Reservoir (on Chapin Mesa), Sagebrush Reservoir (on an unnamed mesa), and Box Elder Reservoir (in Prater Canyon). These four ancient reservoirs represent extraordinary engineering achievements by the Ancestral Puebloan people. In an arid environment with very little surface water, these prehistoric people found ways to route and capture runoff to create sustainable domestic water supply reservoirs.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/McGhiever (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Prehistoric Mesa Verde ReservoirsEra_date_from: 750
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