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Reed Gold Mine Ten-Stamp Mill
Society: SME (mining)Main Category: MiningSub Category: Minerals Extraction & RefiningEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1895Reed Gold Mine Historic SiteMidlandState: NCZip: 28107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.smenet.org/Creator: Mecklenburg Iron Works

The first authenticated discovery of gold in the U.S. occurred on the Cabarrus County farm of John Reed in 1799, sparking the nation's first gold rush. During its peak years, more than a million dollars of gold was recovered a year, making North Carolina a leader in gold production until 1848. This mill, built by the Mecklenburg Iron Works of Charlotte, North Carolina, is original except for the timber work. Two groups of five 750-pound stamps with 5- to 7-inch lift, rose and fell thirty-five times a minute to yield a finely crushed ore.

YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Photo Courtesy of North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.Image Caption: The Stamp Mill at the Reed Gold Mine in Midland, NC.Era_date_from: 1895
Quincy Mining Company No. 2 Mine Hoist
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Materials Handling & ExtractionEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1920The Quincy Mine Hoist AssociationHancockState: MIZip: 49930Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/96-quincy-mining-company-no-2-mine-hoist, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/a59133b1-6a0e-4305-9e3d-096da65f88b1/96-Quincy-Mining-Company-No2-Mine-Hoist.aspxCreator: Quincy Mine Company

The largest mine hoist in the world, it serves the two incline skipways of Shaft No. 2, almost 9,300 feet long. The overhead winding drum has a diameter of 30 feet, of which the cylindrical center section is 10 feet long. The two 10-foot long end sections taper down to a 15-foot diameter. Wire hoisting ropes (almost 27 tons) could be wound onto a small end of the cylindrical drum as the other rope unwound from the cylindrical section.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Public DomainImage Caption: Quincy Mine No 2 Hoist House. Two cooling ponds sat alongside the hoist house which served the cross-compound condensed Nordberg engine. After passing through the condenser, hot water went through sprays to be cooled before recycling.Era_date_from: 1920
Marlette Lake Water System
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 1870-1879DateCreated: 1873-1887Lake Tahoe–Nevada State ParkCarson CityState: NVZip: 89703Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Marlette-Lake-Water-System/Creator: Schussler, Hermann

In the mid-1800s Virginia City was America's greatest producer of high-grade silver and gold ore. When mining activities began, natural springs provided water to the camps. As the population grew, the Virginia and Gold Hill Water Company was formed to address the need for more water. The company first drew water from tunnels that had been driven into the mountains by prospectors. Water was stored in wooden tanks and sent through pipes into the town. 

YearAdded:
1975
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Jeff Moser (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Marlette Lake Water SystemEra_date_from: 1873
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