Skip to main content

RI

Corliss steam engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: SteamEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 19641300 Frenchtown RdEast GreenwichState: RIZip: 02818Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-steam/-164-new-england-wireless-and-steam-museum, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/311b4c58-18b4-4842-9f8b-18a866e6ad13/164-New-England-Wireless-and-Steam-Museum.aspxCreator: Merriam, Robert

Stationary steam engines, once the prime movers of industry, powered trains, ships, and mills in an age when there was no electric power. By the 19th century, American industry, especially in England, was rapidly outgrowing the capacity of the ater power that had been its principal prime mover. The need for a new power source inspired an intense development of the steam engine, the work of inventors directed mainly at imporving fuel efficiency by reducing steam consumption. The leader in this effort was George H.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/The-daffodil (CC BY-SA 4.0)Image Caption: Corliss steam engineEra_date_from: 1964
Wilkinson Mill
Society: SME (manufacturing)Main Category: ManufacturingSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 181067 Roosevelt AvenuePawtucketState: RIZip: 02860Country: USAWebsite: http://www.sme.org/Creator: Wilkinson, David , Wilkinson, Oziel

The Wilkinson Mill, situated on the west bank of the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, was built between 1810 and 1811 by machinist Oziel Wilkinson. Constructed in stone rubble, three and one-half stories high, the mill played a critical role in the history of textile technology, in steam power generation, and in the development of the machine tools industry. The Wilkinson family came to Pawtucket in the 1780s and set up a shop to forge anchors, build presses for oil works, and mold iron screws used in paper pressing machinery.

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/H.C. Williams (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Wilkinson MillEra_date_from: 1810
Wilkinson Mill
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: ManufacturingEra: 1800-1829DateCreated: 181067 Roosevelt AvenuePawtucketState: RIZip: 02860Country: USAWebsite: https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/30-wilkinson-mill, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/30a934f4-2025-47f2-ae87-760d94fe33d3/30-Wilkinson-Mill.aspxCreator: Wilkinson, David , Wilkinson, Oziel

The Wilkinson Mill, situated on the west bank of the Blackstone River in Pawtucket, was built between 1810 and 1811 by machinist Oziel Wilkinson. Constructed in stone rubble, three and one-half stories high, the mill played a critical role in the history of textile technology, in steam power generation, and in the development of the machine tools industry.

 

YearAdded:
1977
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/H.C. Williams (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Wilkinson MillEra_date_from: 1810
Acquedotto Traiano-Paolo
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water Supply & ControlEra: 0-1000DateCreated: 109-110RomeState: RICountry: ItalyWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/acquedotto-traiano-paolo/Creator: Emperor Trajan

The roman emperor Trajan ordered a new aqueduct be built to bring fresh water to Italy's Trastevere region and parts of Rome. The water is collected from five springs that feed the lake at Bracciano, and traverses over 25 miles into Rome. To maintain an even gradient, the aqueduct follows a meandering alignment through the countryside to avoid hills and major valleys. The water runs through an open-channel canal that is either arch-supported, at-grade, or underground.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Credit: Courtesy of Sovraintendenza ai Beni Culturali.Image Caption: The Acquedotto Traiano-Paolo still brings water to Rome.Era_date_from: 109
Rumford Baking Powder
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: New ProductsEra: 1860-1869DateCreated: 1869Rumford Chemical WorksRumfordState: RICountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/bakingpowder.html, https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/bakingpowder/jcr:content/articleContent/columnsbootstrap/column1/image.scale.large.jpg/1380308929369.jpgCreator: Horsford, Eben

Bread is considered a basic foodstuff; eaten down through the ages, it continues to be a staple of the modern diet. The development of baking powder made baking easier, quicker and more reliable for bakers in the mid-19th century. Eben Horsford’s unique formula was an important innovation and made the making of biscuits, cookies and other quick baking products simpler than before.

 

The commemorative plaques read:

YearAdded:
2006
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikicommons/Lou Sander (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: In 2006 Rumford Baking Powder was designated a National Historic Chemical Landmark in recognition of its significance for making baking easier, quicker, and more reliable. Ingredients are monocalcium phosphate, sodium bicarbonate, and cornstarch.
Subscribe to RI

We hope you enjoyed this essay.

Please support this 70-year tradition of trusted historical writing and the volunteers that sustain it with a donation to American Heritage.

Donate

Stay informed - subscribe to our newsletter.
The subscriber's email address.