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1917

Naval Air Station North Island
Society: AIAAMain Category: Aerospace & AviationSub Category: Air and Space TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Naval Air Station North IslandSan DiegoState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://info.aiaa.org/tac/ETMG/HISTC/Shared%20Documents/Historic%20Aerospace%20Sites%20(HAS)/Procedures%20and%20templates/HAS%20blurb.docCreator: U.S. Navy

Known as the birthplace of Naval Aviation, North Island was the site of the first successful seaplane flight and the first amphibious flight in the U.S., both made by Glenn Curtiss.  The first Naval pilot, Lt. T.G. Ellyson, was trained here at the Curtiss Aviation Camp.  A flight school established here by Ellyson trained the next Naval aviators as well as the Navy’s first aviation maintenance personnel.  North Island was also the site of the first night flight, and the home of the first aircraft carrier, the USS Langley.

YearAdded:
2002
Image Caption: USS George Washington and USS Ronald Reagan pierside at Naval Air Station North Island
Entrance to NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia, United States.
Era: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Langley Research CenterHamptonState: VACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.aiaa.org/SecondaryTwoColumn.aspx?id=15032386787Creator: NASA

The Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, now the core of the Langley Research Center, was a unique facility that served as the nexus of aerodynamic research in the U.S. from its beginning in 1917 to its transformation into NASA’s Langley Research Center in 1958. It achieved world renown for its variety of specialized research tools and its staff’s emphasis on practical solutions to the problems of flight.

 

YearAdded:
2001
Image Caption: Entrance to NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia, United States.
Lake Washington Ship Canal & Hiram M. Chittenden Locks
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: Water TransportationEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Hiram M. Chittenden Locks and Carl S. English Jr. Botanical GardenZanesvilleState: WAZip: 98107Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asce.org/project/lake-washington-ship-canal---hiram-m-chittenden-locks/Creator: Chittenden, Hiram

After more than 50 years of contention and debate, dredging began in 1911 on an eight-mile channel connecting Puget Sound, Seattle's gateway to the Pacific, to two inland freshwater lakes, Lake Washington and Lake Union. With the completion of the Lake Washington ship channel and Chittenden locks, coal and logs from the interior had a dedicated water route to the ocean, and the city's 4 1/2 miles of coastal harbor burgeoned into 100 miles of commercial, industrial and recreational piers and wharves.  

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/gb_packards (CC BY-ND 2.0)Image Caption: Lake Washington ship channel and Chittenden locks allowed for the transport of coal and logs and revitalized the coastal harbor.Era_date_from: 1917
Reynolds-Corliss Pumping Engine
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: PumpingEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1917Main Street Pumping StationJacksonvilleState: FLZip: 32206Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-m-z/pumping/-12-reynolds-corliss-pumping-engine-%281917%29, https://www.asme.org/getmedia/15c2d049-d9f4-4272-b2b1-620835320534/12_Reynolds_Corliss_Pumping_Engine.aspxCreator: Allis-Chalmers Company

Installed alongside an Epping Carpenter pump that was later scrapped, this water pump was built by Allis-Chalmers, which for many years had Edwin Reynolds as its chief engineer. Driven by a Corliss steam engine, these large city water pumps were installed in Jacksonville's water supply improvement program in 1915, and each pumped 5 million gallons of water a day until 1930 when the first of the electric-driven peripheral pumping stations began operating. Steam engine operation was discontinued in 1956.

YearAdded:
1976
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Main Street Pumping Station - Jacksonville Water Department - 1917
Old Plant in Foreground - Landmark Reynolds-corliss Engine and
Allis Chalmers Pump Located in the Building in the Background.
View Looking North From Hogan's Creek
Era_date_from: 1917
Quebec Bridge
Society: ASCEMain Category: CivilSub Category: BridgesEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Quebec BridgeQuebec CityState: QuebecZip: G1K 4J9Country: CanadaWebsite: http://www.asce.org/Project/Quebec-Bridge/Creator: McLure, Norman , Cooper, Theodore

The bridge is immense, not only in length and weight but in width. At 67 feet wide, it can accommodate two sets of railway tracks, two sets of streetcar tracks and two roadways.

It took three tries and cost 89 lives, but the city of Quebec was determined to compete with provincial rival Montreal for commercial rail traffic in the late 19th century. The solution was a rail bridge across the St. Lawrence River requiring a single cantilever span 1,800 feet long - the longest ever attempted. 

YearAdded:
1987
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Sebastien Savard (CC BY-SA 2.5)Image Caption: Quebec BridgeEra_date_from: 1917
Gilman Hall
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Gilman HallBerkeleyState: CAZip: 94720Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/gilman.htmlCreator: Lewis, Gilbert , Howard, John Galen

Gilman Hall, built in 1916-1917, accommodated a growing College of Chemistry by providing expanded research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in physical, inorganic and nuclear chemistry. Work performed at Gilman Hall helped advance the fields of chemical thermodynamics and molecular structure, and has resulted in multiple Nobel Prizes. The Hall is most famous for the work of Glenn T. Seaborg and his coworkers, which included the successful identification and production the element Plutonium. Seaborg received the Nobel Prize in 1951 for his accomplishments.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Waqas Bhatti (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Gilman HallEra_date_from: 1917
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