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Nucleic Acid and Protein Chemistry Research at Rockefeller University
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1900-1909DateCreated: 1901Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkState: NYCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/rockefelleruniversity.htmlCreator: Rockefeller, John , Levene, Phoebus

For more than a century, scientists at Rockefeller University have enhanced our understanding of the molecular basis of life — specifically the relationship between the structure and function of nucleic acids and proteins. They showed that DNA transfers genetic information and that the sugars ribose and deoxyribose are the key building blocks of the nucleic acids RNA and DNA.

YearAdded:
2000
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/S Shepherd (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Nucleic Acid and Protein Chemistry Research at Rockefeller UniversityEra_date_from: 1901
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1970-1979DateCreated: 1970s UniversityStony BrookState: NYZip: 11794Country: USAWebsite: http://portal.acs.org/portal/acs/corg/content?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=PP_SUPERARTICLE&node_id=606&use_sec=false&sec_url_var=region1&__uuid=76a7f9e4-c2f5-40cc-8c9f-38996ee20049Creator: Lauterbur, Paul
In the early 1970s, American chemist Paul C. Lauterbur demonstrated that nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) could be used to generate images of macroscopic objects. In the years following, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been refined as a technique for the detailed resolution of internal structures. Lauterbur’s invention thus created a powerful diagnostic tool for the non-invasive examination of body tissues such as the brain, heart, and muscles. It allows for the early detection of cancer and other diseases.
YearAdded:
2011
Image Credit: Original Image: Courtesy of Flickr/Everyone's Idle (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: NMR and MRI: Applications in Chemistry and MedicineEra_date_from: 1970s
Havemeyer Hall
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Columbia UniversityNew YorkState: NYZip: 10027Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/havemeyerhall.htmlCreator: Chandler, Charles Frederick , McKim, Charles Follen

Havemeyer Hall was built between 1896 and 1898 under the leadership of Charles Frederick Chandler. It provided research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in industrial, inorganic, organic, physical, and biological chemistry. Pioneering research done here led to the discovery of deuterium, for which Harold Clayton Urey received the Nobel Prize in 1934. Six others who did research here subsequently received the Nobel Prize, including Irving Langmuir, the first industrial chemist to be so honored, in 1932.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Havemeyer HallEra_date_from: 1898
Gilman Hall
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1917Gilman HallBerkeleyState: CAZip: 94720Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/gilman.htmlCreator: Lewis, Gilbert , Howard, John Galen

Gilman Hall, built in 1916-1917, accommodated a growing College of Chemistry by providing expanded research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in physical, inorganic and nuclear chemistry. Work performed at Gilman Hall helped advance the fields of chemical thermodynamics and molecular structure, and has resulted in multiple Nobel Prizes. The Hall is most famous for the work of Glenn T. Seaborg and his coworkers, which included the successful identification and production the element Plutonium. Seaborg received the Nobel Prize in 1951 for his accomplishments.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Waqas Bhatti (CC BY-SA 2.0)Image Caption: Gilman HallEra_date_from: 1917
Deciphering the Genetic Code
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Frontiers of KnowledgeEra: 1960-1969DateCreated: 1961NIH Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research CtrBethesdaState: MDZip: 20892Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/geneticcode.htmlCreator: Nirenberg, Marshall

In 1961, in the National Institutes of Health Headquarters (Bethesda, MD), Marshall Nirenberg and Heinrich Matthaei discovered the key to breaking the genetic code when they conducted an experiment using a synthetic RNA chain of multiple units of uracil to instruct a chain of amino acids to add phenylalanine. The uracil (poly-U) served as a messenger directing protein synthesis. This experiment demonstrated that messenger RNA transcribes genetic information from DNA, regulating the assembly of amino acids into complex proteins.

YearAdded:
1997
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/Infocan (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Deciphering the Genetic CodeEra_date_from: 1961
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