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1898

Havemeyer Hall
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Cradles of ChemistryEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Columbia UniversityNew YorkState: NYZip: 10027Country: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/havemeyerhall.htmlCreator: Chandler, Charles Frederick , McKim, Charles Follen

Havemeyer Hall was built between 1896 and 1898 under the leadership of Charles Frederick Chandler. It provided research and teaching facilities for faculty and students specializing in industrial, inorganic, organic, physical, and biological chemistry. Pioneering research done here led to the discovery of deuterium, for which Harold Clayton Urey received the Nobel Prize in 1934. Six others who did research here subsequently received the Nobel Prize, including Irving Langmuir, the first industrial chemist to be so honored, in 1932.

YearAdded:
1998
Image Credit: Public Domain; Produced prior to 1/1/1923Image Caption: Havemeyer HallEra_date_from: 1898
Ontario Power Generation
Society: IEEEMain Category: ElectricalSub Category: Power, Energy & Industry ApplicationEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Twelve Mile CreekNiagaraState: OntarioCountry: CanadaWebsite: http://www.ieeeghn.org/wiki/index.php/Milestones:Decew_Falls_Hydro-Electric_Plant,_1898Creator: Patterson, John, Cataract Power Company

The Decew Falls Hydro-Electric Development was a pioneering project in the generation and transmission of electrical energy at higher voltages and at greater distances in Canada. On 25 August 1898 this station transmitted power at 22,500 Volts, 66 2/3 Hz, two-phase, a distance of 56 km to Hamilton, Ontario. Using the higher voltage permitted efficient transmission over that distance. The Cataract Power Company of Hamilton Limited (the predecessor to the Dominion Power and Transmission Company) was organized in 1896.

YearAdded:
2004
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/ontariopowergeneration (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Decew Falls Hydro-Electric PlantEra_date_from: 1898
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Clyde's Cider MillOld MysticState: CTZip: 06355Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-181-bf-clyde-s-cider-mill-%281898%29Creator: Clyde, Benjamin, Boomer & Boschert
Clyde's mill is a rare survivor of a once-commonplace seasonal rural industry. Until recently a cider mill could be found in every community where apples were grown. In the fall, mills converted the fruit of the orchard into drink just as the grist mill converted the grain into flour. Although cider was produced on individual farms for private use, the centrally located mill became popular for farmers who would sell surplus apples to the mill and bring back the juice to ferment into hard cider. In 1881 Benjamin Clyde began pressing his apples at local mills and soon rented his own press.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Erica Peterson (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The steam-powered cider press of BF Clyde's Cider Mill in action.Era_date_from: 1898
Idols Station, Fries Manufacturing & Power Company
Society: ASMEMain Category: Electric, MechanicalSub Category: WaterEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Duke Power Company-Winston-SalemState: NCZip: 27012Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/electric-power-production-water/-99-idols-station,-fries-manufacturing---power-comCreator: Fries Manufacturing and Power Company

This run-of-the-river plant is a typical example of late nineteenth-century small-scale (750 kilowatt) low-head hydroelectric power technology. The Fries Manufacturing and Power Company began operating the Idol's Station on April 18, 1898, making it the first commercial hydroelectric plant in North Carolina involving long-distance power transmission, fourteen-miles distance at 10,000 volts. Idol's was an important power source for transportation, lighting, and industry in the Winston-Salem area.

YearAdded:
1984
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: Idols Station, Fries Manufacturing & Power CompanyEra_date_from: 1898
Commercial Process for Producing Calcium Carbide and Acetylene
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Industrial AdvancesEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Spray Cotton MillsEdenState: NCCountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/calciumcarbideacetylene.html, https://www.acs.org/content/dam/acsorg/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/calciumcarbideacetylene/commericialization-of-calcium-carbide-and-acetylene-commemorative-booklet.pdfCreator: Willson, Thomas L.

In his search for a more economical way to make aluminum, Canadian inventor Thomas Leopold Willson accidentally discovered the first commercially viable process for making calcium carbide, which is used for production of acetylene gas, at a location in North Carolina. This chance discovery produced a series of products, from improved lighting in remote locations to the synthesis of a host of organic substances.

The plaque commemorating the event reads:

YearAdded:
1998
Image Caption: Photographed at the Den Hartogh Ford museum. Highest gas yield for carbide lamps. Sold by Union Carbide corporation, which was formed in 1898 to consolidate the interests of the Electrogas Company.
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