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Food Processing

FMC Sterilizer
Society: ASABEMain Category: Agricultural & BiologicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1920-1929DateCreated: 1920FPSD manufacturing plantMaderaState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.asabe.org/awards-landmarks/asabe-historic-landmarks/fmc-sterilizer-27.aspxCreator: Thompson, Albert R.

The Food Canning Industry Was Revolutionized In 1920, When The Continuous Rotary Pressure Sterilizer Was Introduced By Albert R. Thompson. Thompson Was Chief Engineer For The Anderson-Barngrover Co. Of San Jose, California, Now The FMC Corporation. The Sterilizer Cooked Canned Products Uniformly Under Pressure For Short Period At High Temperatures, Then Quickly Cooled Them Under Pressure To Prevent Swelling Or Bursting. It Operated Continuously At Speeds Of Up To 400 Cans Per Minute.

YearAdded:
1992
Image Caption: The FMC Rotary Pressure Sterilizer
frozen foods
Society: ACSMain Category: ChemicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1950sDateCreated: 1957Western Regional Research CenterAlbanyState: CACountry: USAWebsite: https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/frozenfoods.htmlCreator: Western Regional Research Center

Frozen foods have become a staple of the modern diet. Freezing allows consumers to have access to foods previously unavailable or available only seasonally, and it provides convenience for many families. But frozen foods became commonplace only after World War II, in part due to research conducted at the Western Regional Research Center which helped determine the proper time and temperature at which various foods should be frozen to insure their quality and stability.

 

The plaque commemorating the research reads:

YearAdded:
2002
Image Credit: Courtesy USDA/Scott Bauer (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: Examples of frozen foods
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1850-1859DateCreated: 1852Salt CreekOak BrookState: ILCountry: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-64-graue-mill-%281852%29Creator: Graue, Friedrich , Asche, William
Designed and built by Fred Graue, a German immigrant, together with William Asche, the Old Graue Mill began operating around 1852 and served the village of Brush Hill (Hinsdale) until World War I. Its undershot waterwheel, wooden gearing system, belt power transmission, bucket elevators, and related bolters and sifters were representative of an ancient technology that began with Roman engineer Vitruvius. It ground wheat, corn, oats, and buckwheat in an era that was on the threshold of the Industrial Revolution.
YearAdded:
1981
Image Credit: Public Domain (Historic American Buildings Survey)Image Caption: Graue MillEra_date_from: 1852
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1910-1919DateCreated: 1911Dole Packaged Foods CompanyHonoluluState: HIZip: 96817Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-167-ginaca-pineapple-processing-machine-%281911%29--Creator: Ginaca, Henry Gabriel
Commercial pineapple production began in Hawaii about 1890. Fruit was hand-peeled and sliced to match can sizes for export. In 1911 James D. Dole hired Henry G. Ginaca to design a machine to automate the process. As fruit dropped through the Ginaca machine, a cylinder was cut to proper diameter, trimmed top and bottom, and cored. This machine more than tripled production, making pineapple Hawaii's second largest crop.
YearAdded:
1993
Image Credit: Public Domain (United States Patent)Image Caption: Ginaca Pineapple Processing MachineEra_date_from: 1911
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1940-1949DateCreated: 1947FMC Corporation (Item no longer exists)LakelandState: FLZip: 33801Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-82-fmc-citrus-juice-extractor-%281947%29---Creator: FMC Corporation, Sunkist Corporation
Squeezing an orange for juice is part of the concept of this machine, only on a much larger scale. The extractor revolutionized the juice industry. The twenty-four head rotary action simultaneously extracts juice from the interior of the fruit and citrus oil from the peel surface. The first unit was operated experimentally on grapefruit at the Sunkist Exchange plant in Tempe, Arizona, during late May of 1946. Tests on citrus fruits continued in California, Texas, and Florida.
YearAdded:
1983
Image Credit: Courtesy ASMEImage Caption: FMC Citrus Juice ExtractorEra_date_from: 1947
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 18928801 Citation RoadEssexState: MDZip: 21221Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-174-crown-cork-and-soda-filling-machine-%281892%29Creator: Painter, William
Although bottled carbonated beverages were popular by the 1880s, sealing the bottle was a constant problem. Most "stoppers" were of metal and intended for reuse. None sealed adequately, and contact with the cap often contaminated the drink. In 1892 (Feb 2), William Painter (1838-1906) patented a cheap, single-use metallic cap, crimped over a lip formed on the bottle neck and lined with a thin cork wafer that both formed a leakproof seal and separated drink and metal.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Wikipedia/KMJ (CC BY-SA 3.0)Image Caption: Crown Cork and Soda Filling MachineEra_date_from: 1892
Society: ASMEMain Category: MechanicalSub Category: Food ProcessingEra: 1890-1899DateCreated: 1898Clyde's Cider MillOld MysticState: CTZip: 06355Country: USAWebsite: http://www.asme.org/about-asme/history/landmarks/topics-a-l/food-processing/-181-bf-clyde-s-cider-mill-%281898%29Creator: Clyde, Benjamin, Boomer & Boschert
Clyde's mill is a rare survivor of a once-commonplace seasonal rural industry. Until recently a cider mill could be found in every community where apples were grown. In the fall, mills converted the fruit of the orchard into drink just as the grist mill converted the grain into flour. Although cider was produced on individual farms for private use, the centrally located mill became popular for farmers who would sell surplus apples to the mill and bring back the juice to ferment into hard cider. In 1881 Benjamin Clyde began pressing his apples at local mills and soon rented his own press.
YearAdded:
1994
Image Credit: Courtesy Flickr/Erica Peterson (CC BY 2.0)Image Caption: The steam-powered cider press of BF Clyde's Cider Mill in action.Era_date_from: 1898
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